Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells

Cindy Buffone, Alicia Martinez-Lopez, Thomas Fricke, Silvana Opp, Marco Severgnini, Ingrid Cifola, Luca Petiti, Stella Frabetti, Katarzyna Skorupka, Kaneil K. Zadrozny, Barbie K. Ganser-Pornillos, Owen Pornillos, Francesca Di Nunzio, Felipe Diaz-Griffero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) displays the unique ability to infect nondividing cells. The capsid of HIV-1 is the viral determinant for viral nuclear import. To understand the cellular factors involved in the ability of HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells, we sought to find capsid mutations that allow the virus to infect dividing but not nondividing cells. Because the interaction of capsid with the nucleoporin protein 153 (Nup153) is important for nuclear import of HIV-1, we solved new crystal structures of hexameric HIV-1 capsid in complex with a Nup153-derived peptide containing a phenylalanine-glycine repeat (FG repeat), which we used to guide structure-based mutagenesis of the capsid-binding interface. HIV-1 viruses with mutations in these capsid residues were tested for their ability to infect dividing and nondividing cells. HIV-1 viruses with capsid N57 substitutions infected dividing but not nondividing cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations underwent reverse transcription but not nuclear translocation. The mutant capsids also lost the ability to interact with Nup153 and CPSF6. The use of small molecules PF74 and BI-2 prevented the interaction of FG-containing nucleoporins (Nups), such as Nup153, with the HIV-1 core. Analysis of integration sites in HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations revealed diminished integration into transcriptionally active genes in a manner resembling that of HIV-1 in CPSF6 knockout cells or that of HIV-1-N74D. The integration pattern of the N57 mutant HIV-1 can be explained by loss of capsid interaction with CPSF6, whereas capsid interaction with Nup153 is required for HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells. Additionally, the observed viral integration profiles suggested that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin. IMPORTANCE One of the key advantages that distinguish lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, from all other retroviruses is its ability to infect nondividing cells. Interaction of the HIV-1 capsid with Nup153 and CPSF6 is important for nuclear entry and integration; however, the contribution of each of these proteins to nuclear import and integration is not clear. Using genetics, we demonstrated that these proteins contribute to different processes: Nup153 is essential for the HIV-1 nuclear import in nondividing cells, and CPSF6 is important for HIV-1 integration. In addition, nuclear factors such as CPSF6 and the state of the chromatin are known to be important for integration site selection; nevertheless, the preferential determinant influencing integration site selection is not known. This work demonstrates that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00648
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume92
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins
nucleoporins
Nuclear Pore
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
HIV-1
capsid
Capsid
Proteins
proteins
cells
Cell Nucleus Active Transport
imports
Viruses
viruses
Virus Integration
Chromatin
mutation
chromatin
Mutation
Retroviridae

Keywords

  • Capsid binding
  • CPSF6
  • HIV integration
  • HIV nuclear import
  • HIV-1
  • Integration
  • Nondividing cells
  • NPC
  • Nuclear import
  • Nup153

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells. / Buffone, Cindy; Martinez-Lopez, Alicia; Fricke, Thomas; Opp, Silvana; Severgnini, Marco; Cifola, Ingrid; Petiti, Luca; Frabetti, Stella; Skorupka, Katarzyna; Zadrozny, Kaneil K.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Pornillos, Owen; Nunzio, Francesca Di; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 92, No. 19, e00648, 01.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buffone, C, Martinez-Lopez, A, Fricke, T, Opp, S, Severgnini, M, Cifola, I, Petiti, L, Frabetti, S, Skorupka, K, Zadrozny, KK, Ganser-Pornillos, BK, Pornillos, O, Nunzio, FD & Diaz-Griffero, F 2018, 'Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells', Journal of Virology, vol. 92, no. 19, e00648. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00648-18
Buffone C, Martinez-Lopez A, Fricke T, Opp S, Severgnini M, Cifola I et al. Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells. Journal of Virology. 2018 Oct 1;92(19). e00648. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00648-18
Buffone, Cindy ; Martinez-Lopez, Alicia ; Fricke, Thomas ; Opp, Silvana ; Severgnini, Marco ; Cifola, Ingrid ; Petiti, Luca ; Frabetti, Stella ; Skorupka, Katarzyna ; Zadrozny, Kaneil K. ; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K. ; Pornillos, Owen ; Nunzio, Francesca Di ; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe. / Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells. In: Journal of Virology. 2018 ; Vol. 92, No. 19.
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T1 - Nup153 unlocks the nuclear pore complex for HIV-1 nuclear translocation in nondividing cells

AU - Buffone, Cindy

AU - Martinez-Lopez, Alicia

AU - Fricke, Thomas

AU - Opp, Silvana

AU - Severgnini, Marco

AU - Cifola, Ingrid

AU - Petiti, Luca

AU - Frabetti, Stella

AU - Skorupka, Katarzyna

AU - Zadrozny, Kaneil K.

AU - Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.

AU - Pornillos, Owen

AU - Nunzio, Francesca Di

AU - Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) displays the unique ability to infect nondividing cells. The capsid of HIV-1 is the viral determinant for viral nuclear import. To understand the cellular factors involved in the ability of HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells, we sought to find capsid mutations that allow the virus to infect dividing but not nondividing cells. Because the interaction of capsid with the nucleoporin protein 153 (Nup153) is important for nuclear import of HIV-1, we solved new crystal structures of hexameric HIV-1 capsid in complex with a Nup153-derived peptide containing a phenylalanine-glycine repeat (FG repeat), which we used to guide structure-based mutagenesis of the capsid-binding interface. HIV-1 viruses with mutations in these capsid residues were tested for their ability to infect dividing and nondividing cells. HIV-1 viruses with capsid N57 substitutions infected dividing but not nondividing cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations underwent reverse transcription but not nuclear translocation. The mutant capsids also lost the ability to interact with Nup153 and CPSF6. The use of small molecules PF74 and BI-2 prevented the interaction of FG-containing nucleoporins (Nups), such as Nup153, with the HIV-1 core. Analysis of integration sites in HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations revealed diminished integration into transcriptionally active genes in a manner resembling that of HIV-1 in CPSF6 knockout cells or that of HIV-1-N74D. The integration pattern of the N57 mutant HIV-1 can be explained by loss of capsid interaction with CPSF6, whereas capsid interaction with Nup153 is required for HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells. Additionally, the observed viral integration profiles suggested that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin. IMPORTANCE One of the key advantages that distinguish lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, from all other retroviruses is its ability to infect nondividing cells. Interaction of the HIV-1 capsid with Nup153 and CPSF6 is important for nuclear entry and integration; however, the contribution of each of these proteins to nuclear import and integration is not clear. Using genetics, we demonstrated that these proteins contribute to different processes: Nup153 is essential for the HIV-1 nuclear import in nondividing cells, and CPSF6 is important for HIV-1 integration. In addition, nuclear factors such as CPSF6 and the state of the chromatin are known to be important for integration site selection; nevertheless, the preferential determinant influencing integration site selection is not known. This work demonstrates that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin.

AB - Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) displays the unique ability to infect nondividing cells. The capsid of HIV-1 is the viral determinant for viral nuclear import. To understand the cellular factors involved in the ability of HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells, we sought to find capsid mutations that allow the virus to infect dividing but not nondividing cells. Because the interaction of capsid with the nucleoporin protein 153 (Nup153) is important for nuclear import of HIV-1, we solved new crystal structures of hexameric HIV-1 capsid in complex with a Nup153-derived peptide containing a phenylalanine-glycine repeat (FG repeat), which we used to guide structure-based mutagenesis of the capsid-binding interface. HIV-1 viruses with mutations in these capsid residues were tested for their ability to infect dividing and nondividing cells. HIV-1 viruses with capsid N57 substitutions infected dividing but not nondividing cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations underwent reverse transcription but not nuclear translocation. The mutant capsids also lost the ability to interact with Nup153 and CPSF6. The use of small molecules PF74 and BI-2 prevented the interaction of FG-containing nucleoporins (Nups), such as Nup153, with the HIV-1 core. Analysis of integration sites in HIV-1 viruses with N57 mutations revealed diminished integration into transcriptionally active genes in a manner resembling that of HIV-1 in CPSF6 knockout cells or that of HIV-1-N74D. The integration pattern of the N57 mutant HIV-1 can be explained by loss of capsid interaction with CPSF6, whereas capsid interaction with Nup153 is required for HIV-1 to infect nondividing cells. Additionally, the observed viral integration profiles suggested that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin. IMPORTANCE One of the key advantages that distinguish lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, from all other retroviruses is its ability to infect nondividing cells. Interaction of the HIV-1 capsid with Nup153 and CPSF6 is important for nuclear entry and integration; however, the contribution of each of these proteins to nuclear import and integration is not clear. Using genetics, we demonstrated that these proteins contribute to different processes: Nup153 is essential for the HIV-1 nuclear import in nondividing cells, and CPSF6 is important for HIV-1 integration. In addition, nuclear factors such as CPSF6 and the state of the chromatin are known to be important for integration site selection; nevertheless, the preferential determinant influencing integration site selection is not known. This work demonstrates that integration site selection is a multiparameter process that depends upon nuclear factors and the state of the cellular chromatin.

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KW - CPSF6

KW - HIV integration

KW - HIV nuclear import

KW - HIV-1

KW - Integration

KW - Nondividing cells

KW - NPC

KW - Nuclear import

KW - Nup153

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