Novel molecules that interact with microtubules and have functional activity similar to Taxol™

Lifeng He, George A. Orr, Susan Band Horwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taxol™ is an antitumor drug approved by the FDA for the treatment of ovarian, breast and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. Originally isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, it was the first natural product described that stabilized microtubules. In the past five years, a group of novel natural products, including the epothilones, discodermolide, eleutherobin, sarcodictyins and the laulimalides, all of which have biological activities similar to those of Taxol, has been discovered. In this review, we discuss each of these novel microtubule-stabilizing agents and the search for a common pharmacophore among them, taking into consideration recent advances in our understanding of the taxanes and tubulin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1164
Number of pages12
JournalDrug Discovery Today
Volume6
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2001

Fingerprint

Paclitaxel
Biological Products
Microtubules
Epothilones
Taxus
Taxoids
Excipients
Tubulin
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Antineoplastic Agents
Breast
Therapeutics
discodermolide
eleutherobin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Novel molecules that interact with microtubules and have functional activity similar to Taxol™. / He, Lifeng; Orr, George A.; Band Horwitz, Susan.

In: Drug Discovery Today, Vol. 6, No. 22, 15.11.2001, p. 1153-1164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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