Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina

Arch G. Mainous, Andrew Y. Cheng, Rebecca C. Garr, Barbara C. Tilley, Charles J. Everett, Melissa D. McKee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated in a sample of Latinos the practices of antimicrobial drug importation and use of nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs. In interviews conducted with 219 adults, we assessed health beliefs and past and present behaviors consistent with acquiring antimicrobial drugs without a prescription in the United States. Many (30.6%) believed that antimicrobial drugs should be available in the United States without a prescription. Furthermore, 16.4% had transported nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs into the United States, and 19.2% had acquired antimicrobial agents in the United States without a prescription. A stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the best predictors of having acquired nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in the United States were beliefs and behavior consistent with limited regulations on such drugs. Many persons within the Latino community self-medicate with antimicrobial drugs obtained without a prescription both inside and outside the United States, which adds to the reservoir of antimicrobial drugs in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-888
Number of pages6
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume11
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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Hispanic Americans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Prescriptions
Anti-Infective Agents
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Mainous, A. G., Cheng, A. Y., Garr, R. C., Tilley, B. C., Everett, C. J., & McKee, M. D. (2005). Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 11(6), 883-888.

Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina. / Mainous, Arch G.; Cheng, Andrew Y.; Garr, Rebecca C.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Everett, Charles J.; McKee, Melissa D.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 883-888.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mainous, AG, Cheng, AY, Garr, RC, Tilley, BC, Everett, CJ & McKee, MD 2005, 'Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 883-888.
Mainous AG, Cheng AY, Garr RC, Tilley BC, Everett CJ, McKee MD. Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2005 Jun;11(6):883-888.
Mainous, Arch G. ; Cheng, Andrew Y. ; Garr, Rebecca C. ; Tilley, Barbara C. ; Everett, Charles J. ; McKee, Melissa D. / Nonprescribed antimicrobial drugs in Latino community, South Carolina. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2005 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 883-888.
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