Nonepileptic Uses of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antiepileptic drugs are often prescribed for nonepileptic neurologic and psychiatric conditions. The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved several antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain, migraine, and mania in adults. For pediatric patients, use of antiepileptic drugs for non-seizure-related purposes is supported mainly by adult studies, open-label trials, and case reports. Summarized here is the published literature for or against the use of antiepileptic drugs for neuropathic pain, migraine, movement disorders, bipolar disorder, aggressive behavior, and pervasive developmental disorders in children and adolescents. Using the American Academy of Neurology's four-tiered classification scheme for a therapeutic article and translation to a recommendation rating, there are no nonepileptic disorders for which antiepileptic drugs have been established as effective for pediatric patients. Valproate and carbamazepine are "possibly effective" in the treatment of Sydenham chorea, and valproate is "probably effective" in decreasing aggressive behavior. Carbamazepine is "probably ineffective" in the treatment of aggression, and lamotrigine is "possibly ineffective" in improving the core symptom of pervasive developmental disorders. Despite the frequent use of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of juvenile bipolar disorder, migraine, and neuropathic pain, the data are insufficient to make recommendations regarding the efficacy of antioepileptics in these conditions in children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-432
Number of pages12
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

Fingerprint

Anticonvulsants
Neuralgia
Migraine Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Carbamazepine
Valproic Acid
Pediatrics
Therapeutics
Chorea
Movement Disorders
United States Food and Drug Administration
Neurology
Aggression
Nervous System
Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Nonepileptic Uses of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children and Adolescents. / Golden, Alana S.; Haut, Sheryl R.; Moshe, Solomon L.

In: Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 34, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 421-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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