Non-native language use and risk of incident dementia in the elderly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive reserve is invoked to explain the protective effects of education and cognitively-stimulating activities against all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For non-native English speakers (n-NES), speaking English may be a cognitive activity associated with lower dementia risk. We hypothesized that n-NES have lower risk of incident dementia/AD and that educational level might modify this relationship. Participants took part in the Einstein Aging Study (Bronx, NY), a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. All (n = 1779) spoke fluent English and self-reported birthplace and whether English was their first language. n-NES additionally reported mother tongue, age of English acquisition, and current percentile-use of a non-English language. Nested Cox proportional hazards models progressively adjusted for gender, race, education, and immigrant and marital status estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia/AD as a function of n-NES status. 390 (22%) participants were n-NES. 126 incident dementia cases occurred during 4174 person-years of follow-up (median 1.44; range 0-16); 101 individuals met criteria for probable/possible AD. There was no statistically-significant association between n-NES status and incident dementia in the fully-adjusted model (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.76-2.09; p = 0.36). Results were similar for AD. Stratification of education into three groups revealed increased risk of dementia for n-NES with ≥ 16 years of education (HR 3.97; 95% CI 1.62-9.75; p = 0.003). We conclude that n-NES status does not appear to have an independent protective effect against incident dementia/AD, and that n-NES status may contribute to risk of dementia in an education-dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Dementia
Language
Alzheimer Disease
Education
Proportional Hazards Models
Cognitive Reserve
Marital Status
Tongue
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • dementia
  • incidence
  • multilingualism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Non-native language use and risk of incident dementia in the elderly. / Sanders, Amy E.; Hall, Charles B.; Katz, Mindy Joy; Lipton, Richard B.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2012, p. 99-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c8e61ea6f6354c42b86cd75a6c32af0f,
title = "Non-native language use and risk of incident dementia in the elderly",
abstract = "Cognitive reserve is invoked to explain the protective effects of education and cognitively-stimulating activities against all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For non-native English speakers (n-NES), speaking English may be a cognitive activity associated with lower dementia risk. We hypothesized that n-NES have lower risk of incident dementia/AD and that educational level might modify this relationship. Participants took part in the Einstein Aging Study (Bronx, NY), a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. All (n = 1779) spoke fluent English and self-reported birthplace and whether English was their first language. n-NES additionally reported mother tongue, age of English acquisition, and current percentile-use of a non-English language. Nested Cox proportional hazards models progressively adjusted for gender, race, education, and immigrant and marital status estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia/AD as a function of n-NES status. 390 (22{\%}) participants were n-NES. 126 incident dementia cases occurred during 4174 person-years of follow-up (median 1.44; range 0-16); 101 individuals met criteria for probable/possible AD. There was no statistically-significant association between n-NES status and incident dementia in the fully-adjusted model (HR 1.26; 95{\%} CI 0.76-2.09; p = 0.36). Results were similar for AD. Stratification of education into three groups revealed increased risk of dementia for n-NES with ≥ 16 years of education (HR 3.97; 95{\%} CI 1.62-9.75; p = 0.003). We conclude that n-NES status does not appear to have an independent protective effect against incident dementia/AD, and that n-NES status may contribute to risk of dementia in an education-dependent manner.",
keywords = "Cohort studies, dementia, incidence, multilingualism",
author = "Sanders, {Amy E.} and Hall, {Charles B.} and Katz, {Mindy Joy} and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3233/JAD-2011-111631",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "99--108",
journal = "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease",
issn = "1387-2877",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-native language use and risk of incident dementia in the elderly

AU - Sanders, Amy E.

AU - Hall, Charles B.

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Cognitive reserve is invoked to explain the protective effects of education and cognitively-stimulating activities against all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For non-native English speakers (n-NES), speaking English may be a cognitive activity associated with lower dementia risk. We hypothesized that n-NES have lower risk of incident dementia/AD and that educational level might modify this relationship. Participants took part in the Einstein Aging Study (Bronx, NY), a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. All (n = 1779) spoke fluent English and self-reported birthplace and whether English was their first language. n-NES additionally reported mother tongue, age of English acquisition, and current percentile-use of a non-English language. Nested Cox proportional hazards models progressively adjusted for gender, race, education, and immigrant and marital status estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia/AD as a function of n-NES status. 390 (22%) participants were n-NES. 126 incident dementia cases occurred during 4174 person-years of follow-up (median 1.44; range 0-16); 101 individuals met criteria for probable/possible AD. There was no statistically-significant association between n-NES status and incident dementia in the fully-adjusted model (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.76-2.09; p = 0.36). Results were similar for AD. Stratification of education into three groups revealed increased risk of dementia for n-NES with ≥ 16 years of education (HR 3.97; 95% CI 1.62-9.75; p = 0.003). We conclude that n-NES status does not appear to have an independent protective effect against incident dementia/AD, and that n-NES status may contribute to risk of dementia in an education-dependent manner.

AB - Cognitive reserve is invoked to explain the protective effects of education and cognitively-stimulating activities against all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For non-native English speakers (n-NES), speaking English may be a cognitive activity associated with lower dementia risk. We hypothesized that n-NES have lower risk of incident dementia/AD and that educational level might modify this relationship. Participants took part in the Einstein Aging Study (Bronx, NY), a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. All (n = 1779) spoke fluent English and self-reported birthplace and whether English was their first language. n-NES additionally reported mother tongue, age of English acquisition, and current percentile-use of a non-English language. Nested Cox proportional hazards models progressively adjusted for gender, race, education, and immigrant and marital status estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia/AD as a function of n-NES status. 390 (22%) participants were n-NES. 126 incident dementia cases occurred during 4174 person-years of follow-up (median 1.44; range 0-16); 101 individuals met criteria for probable/possible AD. There was no statistically-significant association between n-NES status and incident dementia in the fully-adjusted model (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.76-2.09; p = 0.36). Results were similar for AD. Stratification of education into three groups revealed increased risk of dementia for n-NES with ≥ 16 years of education (HR 3.97; 95% CI 1.62-9.75; p = 0.003). We conclude that n-NES status does not appear to have an independent protective effect against incident dementia/AD, and that n-NES status may contribute to risk of dementia in an education-dependent manner.

KW - Cohort studies

KW - dementia

KW - incidence

KW - multilingualism

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84858142150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84858142150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JAD-2011-111631

DO - 10.3233/JAD-2011-111631

M3 - Article

C2 - 22232011

AN - SCOPUS:84858142150

VL - 29

SP - 99

EP - 108

JO - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

JF - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

SN - 1387-2877

IS - 1

ER -