No consistent relationship between gamma power and peak frequency in macaque primary visual cortex

Xiaoxuan Jia, Dajun Xing, Adam Kohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neural activity in the gamma frequency range ("gamma") is elevated during active cognitive states.Gammahas been proposed to play an important role in cortical function, although this is debated. Understanding what function gamma might fulfill requires a better understanding of its properties and the mechanisms that generate it. Gamma is characterized by its spectral power and peak frequency, and variations in both parameters have been associated with changes in behavioral performance. Modeling studies suggest these properties are co-modulated, but this has not been established. To test the relationship between these properties, we measured local field potentials (LFPs) and neuronal spiking responses in primary visual cortex of anesthetized monkeys, for drifting sinusoidal gratings of different sizes, contrasts, orientations and masked with different levels of noise. We find that there is no fixed relationship between LFP gamma power and peak frequency, and neither is related to the strength of spiking activity. We propose a simple model that can account for the complex stimulus dependence we observe, and suggest that separate mechanisms determine gamma power and peak frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2013

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Macaca
Visual Cortex
Haplorhini
Noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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No consistent relationship between gamma power and peak frequency in macaque primary visual cortex. / Jia, Xiaoxuan; Xing, Dajun; Kohn, Adam.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 33, No. 1, 02.01.2013, p. 17-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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