Nicotine dependence, motivation to quit, and diagnosis among adult emergency department patients who smoke: A national survey

Steven L. Bernstein, Edwin D. Boudreaux, Lisa Cabral, Rita K. Cydulka, David Schwegman, Gregory L. Larkin, Annette L. Adams, Lynne B. McCullough, Karin V. Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients in hospital emergency departments smoke more than the general population. Smoking profiles of these patients have largely been characterized in small, single-institution cohorts. Our objective was to survey adult smokers visiting a sample of U.S. emergency departments, as part of a study examining the efficacy of an educational intervention on physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior regarding tobacco control. A convenience sample of patients in eight academic emergency departments was surveyed from May to July 2006. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older, were every- or some-day smokers, spoke English or Spanish, were able to provide written informed consent, and were not actively psychotic. Descriptive statistics are reported using parametric and nonparametric measures. A total of 1,168 patients were interviewed (mean age = 40.7 years); 46.5% were female, 54.4% were uninsured or had Medicaid, and 29.9% had no usual source of care. Patients smoked a median of 10 cigarettes daily, with a median score on the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence of 4, and a median score of 5 on the nine-point contemplation ladder, indicating a desire to quit within 6 months. Smokers with a diagnosis of cardiovascular, respiratory, or malignant disease were more interested in quitting than others (median ladder score = 4 vs. 6, p< 001), were more likely to believe they had a smoking-related illness, and were more likely to believe their emergency department visit was related to smoking. Smokers with a presenting complaint of chest pain or dyspnea were more interested in quitting than others (median ladder score = 4 vs. 6, p = .002). Emergency department patients smoked at moderate amounts, with moderate levels of addiction and interest in quitting. Smokers with tobacco-related diagnoses, or who believed their emergency department visit was related to smoking, were more interested in quitting. These findings suggest that the emergency department visit may provide a teachable moment to reach smokers who have tobacco-related problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1277-1282
Number of pages6
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Disorder
Smoke
Hospital Emergency Service
Motivation
Smoking
Tobacco
Hospital Departments
Medicaid
Surveys and Questionnaires
Informed Consent
Chest Pain
Tobacco Products
Dyspnea
Physicians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nicotine dependence, motivation to quit, and diagnosis among adult emergency department patients who smoke : A national survey. / Bernstein, Steven L.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.; Cabral, Lisa; Cydulka, Rita K.; Schwegman, David; Larkin, Gregory L.; Adams, Annette L.; McCullough, Lynne B.; Rhodes, Karin V.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 10, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 1277-1282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernstein, SL, Boudreaux, ED, Cabral, L, Cydulka, RK, Schwegman, D, Larkin, GL, Adams, AL, McCullough, LB & Rhodes, KV 2008, 'Nicotine dependence, motivation to quit, and diagnosis among adult emergency department patients who smoke: A national survey', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 1277-1282. https://doi.org/10.1080/14622200802239272
Bernstein, Steven L. ; Boudreaux, Edwin D. ; Cabral, Lisa ; Cydulka, Rita K. ; Schwegman, David ; Larkin, Gregory L. ; Adams, Annette L. ; McCullough, Lynne B. ; Rhodes, Karin V. / Nicotine dependence, motivation to quit, and diagnosis among adult emergency department patients who smoke : A national survey. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2008 ; Vol. 10, No. 8. pp. 1277-1282.
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