Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients

Linda B. Haramati, G. Lee, A. Singh, P. L. Molina, C. S. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the radiologic and clinical features of newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten HIV-infected patients (seven women, three men; age range, 26-66 years; mean age, 37 years) with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis between 1989 and 1997 were retrospectively identified. Charts were reviewed for the interval between the two diagnoses, CD4 cell count, signs or symptoms, angiotensin-converting enzyme level, and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Chest radiographs (n = 10) and computed tomographic (CT) scans (n = 8) were assessed for lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular or granular opacities (thickened interlobular septa and ground-glass opacities at CT), cysts or cavities, and fibrosis. RESULTS: Mean interval between the two diagnoses was 3 years. Mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells per cubic millimeter. When sarcoidosis was diagnosed, eight patients had pulmonary signs or symptoms. The angiotensin-converting enzyme level was elevated in five of six patients; two developed sarcoidosis after beginning HAART. Chest radiographs revealed lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, granular opacities, and cysts or cavities. Chest CT scans revealed lymphadenopathy, nodules, thickened interlobular septa, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, ground-glass opacities, and cysts or cavities. There was no relationship between the radiographic findings of sarcoidosis and the CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: The radiologic features of newly diagnosed sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients resemble the findings of sarcoidosis in non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients receiving HAART, sarcoidosis may be a manifestation of disease related to restoration of the immune system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-246
Number of pages5
JournalRadiology
Volume218
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001

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Pulmonary Sarcoidosis
Sarcoidosis
HIV
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Cysts
Thorax
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Lung
Signs and Symptoms
Glass
Immune System
Fibrosis
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Haramati, L. B., Lee, G., Singh, A., Molina, P. L., & White, C. S. (2001). Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients. Radiology, 218(1), 242-246.

Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients. / Haramati, Linda B.; Lee, G.; Singh, A.; Molina, P. L.; White, C. S.

In: Radiology, Vol. 218, No. 1, 2001, p. 242-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haramati, LB, Lee, G, Singh, A, Molina, PL & White, CS 2001, 'Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients', Radiology, vol. 218, no. 1, pp. 242-246.
Haramati LB, Lee G, Singh A, Molina PL, White CS. Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients. Radiology. 2001;218(1):242-246.
Haramati, Linda B. ; Lee, G. ; Singh, A. ; Molina, P. L. ; White, C. S. / Newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients. In: Radiology. 2001 ; Vol. 218, No. 1. pp. 242-246.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To determine the radiologic and clinical features of newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten HIV-infected patients (seven women, three men; age range, 26-66 years; mean age, 37 years) with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis between 1989 and 1997 were retrospectively identified. Charts were reviewed for the interval between the two diagnoses, CD4 cell count, signs or symptoms, angiotensin-converting enzyme level, and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Chest radiographs (n = 10) and computed tomographic (CT) scans (n = 8) were assessed for lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular or granular opacities (thickened interlobular septa and ground-glass opacities at CT), cysts or cavities, and fibrosis. RESULTS: Mean interval between the two diagnoses was 3 years. Mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells per cubic millimeter. When sarcoidosis was diagnosed, eight patients had pulmonary signs or symptoms. The angiotensin-converting enzyme level was elevated in five of six patients; two developed sarcoidosis after beginning HAART. Chest radiographs revealed lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, granular opacities, and cysts or cavities. Chest CT scans revealed lymphadenopathy, nodules, thickened interlobular septa, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, ground-glass opacities, and cysts or cavities. There was no relationship between the radiographic findings of sarcoidosis and the CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: The radiologic features of newly diagnosed sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients resemble the findings of sarcoidosis in non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients receiving HAART, sarcoidosis may be a manifestation of disease related to restoration of the immune system.",
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N2 - PURPOSE: To determine the radiologic and clinical features of newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten HIV-infected patients (seven women, three men; age range, 26-66 years; mean age, 37 years) with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis between 1989 and 1997 were retrospectively identified. Charts were reviewed for the interval between the two diagnoses, CD4 cell count, signs or symptoms, angiotensin-converting enzyme level, and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Chest radiographs (n = 10) and computed tomographic (CT) scans (n = 8) were assessed for lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular or granular opacities (thickened interlobular septa and ground-glass opacities at CT), cysts or cavities, and fibrosis. RESULTS: Mean interval between the two diagnoses was 3 years. Mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells per cubic millimeter. When sarcoidosis was diagnosed, eight patients had pulmonary signs or symptoms. The angiotensin-converting enzyme level was elevated in five of six patients; two developed sarcoidosis after beginning HAART. Chest radiographs revealed lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, granular opacities, and cysts or cavities. Chest CT scans revealed lymphadenopathy, nodules, thickened interlobular septa, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, ground-glass opacities, and cysts or cavities. There was no relationship between the radiographic findings of sarcoidosis and the CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: The radiologic features of newly diagnosed sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients resemble the findings of sarcoidosis in non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients receiving HAART, sarcoidosis may be a manifestation of disease related to restoration of the immune system.

AB - PURPOSE: To determine the radiologic and clinical features of newly diagnosed pulmonary sarcoidosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten HIV-infected patients (seven women, three men; age range, 26-66 years; mean age, 37 years) with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis between 1989 and 1997 were retrospectively identified. Charts were reviewed for the interval between the two diagnoses, CD4 cell count, signs or symptoms, angiotensin-converting enzyme level, and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Chest radiographs (n = 10) and computed tomographic (CT) scans (n = 8) were assessed for lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular or granular opacities (thickened interlobular septa and ground-glass opacities at CT), cysts or cavities, and fibrosis. RESULTS: Mean interval between the two diagnoses was 3 years. Mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells per cubic millimeter. When sarcoidosis was diagnosed, eight patients had pulmonary signs or symptoms. The angiotensin-converting enzyme level was elevated in five of six patients; two developed sarcoidosis after beginning HAART. Chest radiographs revealed lymphadenopathy, pulmonary nodules, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, granular opacities, and cysts or cavities. Chest CT scans revealed lymphadenopathy, nodules, thickened interlobular septa, focal consolidation, reticular opacities, ground-glass opacities, and cysts or cavities. There was no relationship between the radiographic findings of sarcoidosis and the CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: The radiologic features of newly diagnosed sarcoidosis in HIV-infected patients resemble the findings of sarcoidosis in non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients receiving HAART, sarcoidosis may be a manifestation of disease related to restoration of the immune system.

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