Neuropeptide y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution

The POUNDS LOST trial

Xiaochen Lin, Qibin Qi, Yan Zheng, Tao Huang, Mark Lathrop, Diana Zelenika, George A. Bray, Frank M. Sacks, Liming Liang, Lu Qi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Neuropeptide Y is a key peptide affecting adiposity and has been related to obesity risk. However, little is known about the role of NPY variations in diet-induced change in adiposity. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of NPY variant rs16147 on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution in response to dietary interventions. Design: We genotyped a functional NPY variant rs16147 among 723 participants in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies trial. Changes in waist circumference (WC), total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from baseline to 6 and 24 mo were evaluated with respect to the rs16147 genotypes. Genotype-dietary fat interaction was also examined. Results: The rs16147 C allele was associated with a greater reduction in WC at 6 mo (P , 0.001). In addition, the genotypes showed a statistically significant interaction with dietary fat in relation to WC and SAT (P-interaction = 0.01 and 0.04): the association was stronger in individuals with high-fat intake than in those with low-fat intake. At 24 mo, the association remained statistically significant for WC in the high-fat diet group (P = 0.02), although the gene-dietary fat interaction became nonsignificant (P = 0.30). In addition, we found statistically significant genotype-dietary fat interaction on the change in total abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and SAT at 24 mo (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.04): the rs16147 T allele appeared to associate with more adverse change in the abdominal fat deposition in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Conclusion: Our data indicate that the NPY rs16147 genotypes affect the change in abdominal adiposity in response to dietary interventions, and the effects of the rs16147 single-nucleotide polymorphism on central obesity and abdominal fat distribution were modified by dietary fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-519
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume102
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Abdominal Fat
Abdominal Obesity
Dietary Fats
Neuropeptides
Waist Circumference
Genotype
Subcutaneous Fat
Adiposity
Intra-Abdominal Fat
High Fat Diet
Fats
Alleles
Fat-Restricted Diet
Neuropeptide Y
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Obesity
Diet
Peptides
Genes

Keywords

  • Dietary fat
  • Fat distribution
  • Gene-nutrient interaction
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • SNP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Neuropeptide y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution : The POUNDS LOST trial. / Lin, Xiaochen; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Tao; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Bray, George A.; Sacks, Frank M.; Liang, Liming; Qi, Lu.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 102, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 514-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, X, Qi, Q, Zheng, Y, Huang, T, Lathrop, M, Zelenika, D, Bray, GA, Sacks, FM, Liang, L & Qi, L 2015, 'Neuropeptide y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution: The POUNDS LOST trial', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 514-519. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.107276
Lin, Xiaochen ; Qi, Qibin ; Zheng, Yan ; Huang, Tao ; Lathrop, Mark ; Zelenika, Diana ; Bray, George A. ; Sacks, Frank M. ; Liang, Liming ; Qi, Lu. / Neuropeptide y genotype, central obesity, and abdominal fat distribution : The POUNDS LOST trial. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 102, No. 2. pp. 514-519.
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