Multiple sclerosis: Death receptor expression and oligodendrocyte apoptosis in established lesions

Barbara Cannella, Stefanie Gaupp, Kakuri M. Omari, Cedric S. Raine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether TNF and TRAIL death receptors (DR), and decoy receptors (DcR), play a role in oligodendrocyte depletion in the lesions of chronic multiple sclerosis (MS), we investigated the presence and functionality of these molecules on oligodendrocytes in MS and non-MS brain tissue and on human oligodendrocytes in vitro. For this, we performed immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, TUNEL and FACS analysis for the presence of DR and apoptosis in sections of fresh frozen CNS tissue from cases of chronic MS, other neurologic diseases and normals, and in fetal human oligodendrocytes in vitro. The results showed that although oligodendrocytes demonstrated both DR and DcR, particularly in vitro, there was no predilection of the phenomenon for MS and apoptosis of oligodendrocytes, common in cultures after ligation with TRAIL, was negligible in CNS tissue in situ. Thus, death of oligodendrocytes by apoptosis was an infrequent event in all human CNS samples examined. We postulate that while oligodendrocyte apoptosis might prevail during the initial stages of MS, from our findings other mechanisms probably account for their loss in the established lesion and decoy receptors may play a protective role in oligodendrocyte survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-137
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume188
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Death Domain Receptors
Oligodendroglia
Multiple Sclerosis
Apoptosis
TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Receptors
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Frozen Sections
Sclerosis
Nervous System Diseases
Ligation
Western Blotting
Immunohistochemistry

Keywords

  • Cell death
  • Oligodendrocytes
  • TRAIL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Neurology

Cite this

Multiple sclerosis : Death receptor expression and oligodendrocyte apoptosis in established lesions. / Cannella, Barbara; Gaupp, Stefanie; Omari, Kakuri M.; Raine, Cedric S.

In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, Vol. 188, No. 1-2, 08.2007, p. 128-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cannella, Barbara ; Gaupp, Stefanie ; Omari, Kakuri M. ; Raine, Cedric S. / Multiple sclerosis : Death receptor expression and oligodendrocyte apoptosis in established lesions. In: Journal of Neuroimmunology. 2007 ; Vol. 188, No. 1-2. pp. 128-137.
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