Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

end organ and systemic inflammatory response in a mouse model of nonseptic origin.

Jay R. Shayevitz, C. Miller, K. J. Johnson, J. L. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors measured the peripheral blood pro-inflammatory cytokine responses (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and related end organ responses ti intraperitoneal zymosan-saline suspension over 5 days in CD-1 mice. Other indicators of local and systemic inflammation included wet:dry weight ratios of lung, liver, kidneys, spleen, and bowel; peripheral blood hematocrit, white blood cell count, and platelet count; lung myeloperoxidase activity; lung protein leak; and bacterial translocation to liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. The initial event in responses to zymosan A injection was a sharp rise in the peripheral blood TNF-alpha level, which crested within 1 h of injection. This response was followed by a peripheral blood leukocytosis also within 1 h, and a peak lung myeloperoxidase activity within 1-2 h of injection. The maximum lung permeability index occurred 8 h after injection (zymosan, .398 +/- .019 [n = 10]; saline vehicle, .266 +/- .007 [n = 10], p < .001) followed by the maximum lung wet:dry weight ratio, which occurred 18 h after injection. The peak wet:dry weight ratios for the other organs occurred between 12 and 24 h after injection as well. Peripheral blood IL-6 maxima followed TNF-a maxima after lags of several hours. The release of pre-formed TNF-a is likely the most proximal event following injection of zymosan, and may set in motion the processes that result in end-organ injury and secondary multiple organ dysfunction, particularly activation of leukocytes. The precise roles of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of end-organ injury, however, are not addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-396
Number of pages8
JournalShock (Augusta, Ga.)
Volume4
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multiple Organ Failure
Zymosan
Injections
Lung
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Weights and Measures
Peroxidase
Spleen
Bacterial Translocation
Multiple Trauma
Liver
Leukocytosis
Pulmonary Edema
Platelet Count
Leukocyte Count
Hematocrit
Permeability
Suspensions
Leukocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Physiology

Cite this

Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome : end organ and systemic inflammatory response in a mouse model of nonseptic origin. / Shayevitz, Jay R.; Miller, C.; Johnson, K. J.; Rodriguez, J. L.

In: Shock (Augusta, Ga.), Vol. 4, No. 6, 12.1995, p. 389-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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