MRI of the male pelvic floor

Janesh Lakhoo, Gaurav Khatri, Rania F. Elsayed, Victoria Chernyak, Jeffrey Olpin, Ari Steiner, Varaha S. Tammisetti, Karthik M. Sundaram, Sandeep S. Arora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The pelvic floor is a complex structure that supports the pelvic organs and provides resting tone and voluntary control of the urethral and anal sphincters. Dysfunction of or injury to the pelvic floor can lead to gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction. The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders is much lower in men than in women, and because of this, the majority of the published literature pertaining to MRI of the pelvic floor is oriented toward evaluation of the female pelvic floor. The male pelvic floor has sex-specific differences in anatomy and pathophysiologic disorders. Despite these differences, static and dynamic MRI features of these disorders, specifically gastrointestinal disorders, are similar in both sexes. MRI and MR defecography can be used to evaluate anorectal disorders related to the pelvic floor. MRI can also be used after prostatectomy to help predict the risk of postsurgical incontinence, to evaluate postsurgical function by using dynamic voiding MR cystourethrography, and subsequently, to assess causes of incontinence treatment failure. Increased tone of the pelvic musculature in men secondary to chronic pain can lead to sexual dysfunction. This article reviews normal male pelvic floor anatomy and how it differs from the female pelvis; MRI techniques for imaging the male pelvis; and urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual conditions related to abnormalities of pelvic floor structures in men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2003-2022
Number of pages20
JournalRadiographics
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Pelvic Floor
Pelvis
Anatomy
Rectal Diseases
Pelvic Floor Disorders
Defecography
Anal Canal
Urethra
Prostatectomy
Treatment Failure
Sex Characteristics
Chronic Pain
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Lakhoo, J., Khatri, G., Elsayed, R. F., Chernyak, V., Olpin, J., Steiner, A., ... Arora, S. S. (2019). MRI of the male pelvic floor. Radiographics, 39(7), 2003-2022. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.2019190064

MRI of the male pelvic floor. / Lakhoo, Janesh; Khatri, Gaurav; Elsayed, Rania F.; Chernyak, Victoria; Olpin, Jeffrey; Steiner, Ari; Tammisetti, Varaha S.; Sundaram, Karthik M.; Arora, Sandeep S.

In: Radiographics, Vol. 39, No. 7, 01.11.2019, p. 2003-2022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lakhoo, J, Khatri, G, Elsayed, RF, Chernyak, V, Olpin, J, Steiner, A, Tammisetti, VS, Sundaram, KM & Arora, SS 2019, 'MRI of the male pelvic floor', Radiographics, vol. 39, no. 7, pp. 2003-2022. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.2019190064
Lakhoo J, Khatri G, Elsayed RF, Chernyak V, Olpin J, Steiner A et al. MRI of the male pelvic floor. Radiographics. 2019 Nov 1;39(7):2003-2022. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.2019190064
Lakhoo, Janesh ; Khatri, Gaurav ; Elsayed, Rania F. ; Chernyak, Victoria ; Olpin, Jeffrey ; Steiner, Ari ; Tammisetti, Varaha S. ; Sundaram, Karthik M. ; Arora, Sandeep S. / MRI of the male pelvic floor. In: Radiographics. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 7. pp. 2003-2022.
@article{a275ce0d410a4d4cae7608f947b22fff,
title = "MRI of the male pelvic floor",
abstract = "The pelvic floor is a complex structure that supports the pelvic organs and provides resting tone and voluntary control of the urethral and anal sphincters. Dysfunction of or injury to the pelvic floor can lead to gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction. The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders is much lower in men than in women, and because of this, the majority of the published literature pertaining to MRI of the pelvic floor is oriented toward evaluation of the female pelvic floor. The male pelvic floor has sex-specific differences in anatomy and pathophysiologic disorders. Despite these differences, static and dynamic MRI features of these disorders, specifically gastrointestinal disorders, are similar in both sexes. MRI and MR defecography can be used to evaluate anorectal disorders related to the pelvic floor. MRI can also be used after prostatectomy to help predict the risk of postsurgical incontinence, to evaluate postsurgical function by using dynamic voiding MR cystourethrography, and subsequently, to assess causes of incontinence treatment failure. Increased tone of the pelvic musculature in men secondary to chronic pain can lead to sexual dysfunction. This article reviews normal male pelvic floor anatomy and how it differs from the female pelvis; MRI techniques for imaging the male pelvis; and urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual conditions related to abnormalities of pelvic floor structures in men.",
author = "Janesh Lakhoo and Gaurav Khatri and Elsayed, {Rania F.} and Victoria Chernyak and Jeffrey Olpin and Ari Steiner and Tammisetti, {Varaha S.} and Sundaram, {Karthik M.} and Arora, {Sandeep S.}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1148/rg.2019190064",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "2003--2022",
journal = "Radiographics",
issn = "0271-5333",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - MRI of the male pelvic floor

AU - Lakhoo, Janesh

AU - Khatri, Gaurav

AU - Elsayed, Rania F.

AU - Chernyak, Victoria

AU - Olpin, Jeffrey

AU - Steiner, Ari

AU - Tammisetti, Varaha S.

AU - Sundaram, Karthik M.

AU - Arora, Sandeep S.

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - The pelvic floor is a complex structure that supports the pelvic organs and provides resting tone and voluntary control of the urethral and anal sphincters. Dysfunction of or injury to the pelvic floor can lead to gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction. The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders is much lower in men than in women, and because of this, the majority of the published literature pertaining to MRI of the pelvic floor is oriented toward evaluation of the female pelvic floor. The male pelvic floor has sex-specific differences in anatomy and pathophysiologic disorders. Despite these differences, static and dynamic MRI features of these disorders, specifically gastrointestinal disorders, are similar in both sexes. MRI and MR defecography can be used to evaluate anorectal disorders related to the pelvic floor. MRI can also be used after prostatectomy to help predict the risk of postsurgical incontinence, to evaluate postsurgical function by using dynamic voiding MR cystourethrography, and subsequently, to assess causes of incontinence treatment failure. Increased tone of the pelvic musculature in men secondary to chronic pain can lead to sexual dysfunction. This article reviews normal male pelvic floor anatomy and how it differs from the female pelvis; MRI techniques for imaging the male pelvis; and urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual conditions related to abnormalities of pelvic floor structures in men.

AB - The pelvic floor is a complex structure that supports the pelvic organs and provides resting tone and voluntary control of the urethral and anal sphincters. Dysfunction of or injury to the pelvic floor can lead to gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction. The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders is much lower in men than in women, and because of this, the majority of the published literature pertaining to MRI of the pelvic floor is oriented toward evaluation of the female pelvic floor. The male pelvic floor has sex-specific differences in anatomy and pathophysiologic disorders. Despite these differences, static and dynamic MRI features of these disorders, specifically gastrointestinal disorders, are similar in both sexes. MRI and MR defecography can be used to evaluate anorectal disorders related to the pelvic floor. MRI can also be used after prostatectomy to help predict the risk of postsurgical incontinence, to evaluate postsurgical function by using dynamic voiding MR cystourethrography, and subsequently, to assess causes of incontinence treatment failure. Increased tone of the pelvic musculature in men secondary to chronic pain can lead to sexual dysfunction. This article reviews normal male pelvic floor anatomy and how it differs from the female pelvis; MRI techniques for imaging the male pelvis; and urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual conditions related to abnormalities of pelvic floor structures in men.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074699676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074699676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1148/rg.2019190064

DO - 10.1148/rg.2019190064

M3 - Article

C2 - 31697623

AN - SCOPUS:85074699676

VL - 39

SP - 2003

EP - 2022

JO - Radiographics

JF - Radiographics

SN - 0271-5333

IS - 7

ER -