Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and risk of mortality in older adults

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Abstract

Introduction: Cognitive impairment is associated with increased mortality. We examined the association between motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, a predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, and survival. Methods: A total of 11,867 nondemented participants aged >65 years from three established cohort studies in the United States and Europe were screened for MCR. Mortality risk of MCR was assessed with Cox and logistic regression models. Results: At baseline, 836 (7.0%) participants had MCR. Over a median follow-up of 28 months, 1603 participants died (758 in first 2 years). MCR was associated with increased mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-1.96) and 2-year mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.50-2.38). The association remained after accounting for established mortality risk factors as well as baseline gait speed and memory performance. Discussion: MCR is associated with increased mortality. Older adults should be screened for MCR to identify at-risk individuals for dementia and death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Mortality
Logistic Models
Confidence Intervals
Gait
Dementia
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia
  • Gait speed
  • Mortality
  • Motoric cognitive risk syndrome
  • Predementia syndromes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

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title = "Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and risk of mortality in older adults",
abstract = "Introduction: Cognitive impairment is associated with increased mortality. We examined the association between motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, a predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, and survival. Methods: A total of 11,867 nondemented participants aged >65 years from three established cohort studies in the United States and Europe were screened for MCR. Mortality risk of MCR was assessed with Cox and logistic regression models. Results: At baseline, 836 (7.0{\%}) participants had MCR. Over a median follow-up of 28 months, 1603 participants died (758 in first 2 years). MCR was associated with increased mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.69; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.46-1.96) and 2-year mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.89; 95{\%} CI, 1.50-2.38). The association remained after accounting for established mortality risk factors as well as baseline gait speed and memory performance. Discussion: MCR is associated with increased mortality. Older adults should be screened for MCR to identify at-risk individuals for dementia and death.",
keywords = "Cognitive impairment, Dementia, Gait speed, Mortality, Motoric cognitive risk syndrome, Predementia syndromes",
author = "Ayers, {Emmeline I.} and Joe Verghese",
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journal = "Alzheimer's and Dementia",
issn = "1552-5260",
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N2 - Introduction: Cognitive impairment is associated with increased mortality. We examined the association between motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, a predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, and survival. Methods: A total of 11,867 nondemented participants aged >65 years from three established cohort studies in the United States and Europe were screened for MCR. Mortality risk of MCR was assessed with Cox and logistic regression models. Results: At baseline, 836 (7.0%) participants had MCR. Over a median follow-up of 28 months, 1603 participants died (758 in first 2 years). MCR was associated with increased mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-1.96) and 2-year mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.50-2.38). The association remained after accounting for established mortality risk factors as well as baseline gait speed and memory performance. Discussion: MCR is associated with increased mortality. Older adults should be screened for MCR to identify at-risk individuals for dementia and death.

AB - Introduction: Cognitive impairment is associated with increased mortality. We examined the association between motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, a predementia syndrome characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, and survival. Methods: A total of 11,867 nondemented participants aged >65 years from three established cohort studies in the United States and Europe were screened for MCR. Mortality risk of MCR was assessed with Cox and logistic regression models. Results: At baseline, 836 (7.0%) participants had MCR. Over a median follow-up of 28 months, 1603 participants died (758 in first 2 years). MCR was associated with increased mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-1.96) and 2-year mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.50-2.38). The association remained after accounting for established mortality risk factors as well as baseline gait speed and memory performance. Discussion: MCR is associated with increased mortality. Older adults should be screened for MCR to identify at-risk individuals for dementia and death.

KW - Cognitive impairment

KW - Dementia

KW - Gait speed

KW - Mortality

KW - Motoric cognitive risk syndrome

KW - Predementia syndromes

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