Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and predictors of transition to dementia

A multicenter study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: To report clinical predictors of transition to dementia in motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a predementia syndrome characterized by cognitive complaints and slow gait. Methods: We examined if cognitive or motoric impairments predicted transition to dementia in 610 older adults with MCR from three cohorts. Association of cognitive (logical memory, clinical dementia rating, cognitive complaint severity, and Mini–Mental State Examination) and motoric factors (gait velocity) with dementia risk was computed using Cox models. Results: There were 156 incident dementias (134 Alzheimer's disease). In the pooled sample, logical memory (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.91), cognitive complaint severity (aHR 1.53), and Mini–Mental State Examination (aHR 0.75) predicted transition of MCR to dementia. Clinical dementia rating score ≥0.5 predicted dementia (aHR 3.18) in one cohort. Gait velocity did not predict dementia. Discussion: While MCR is a motoric-based predementia syndrome, severity of cognitive but not motoric impairments predicts conversion to dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Multicenter Studies
Dementia
Gait
Proportional Hazards Models
Alzheimer Disease

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • Dementia
  • Gait disorders
  • Incidence studies
  • Motoric cognitive risk syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{391c8cf9d362469a91c268d74ee338eb,
title = "Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and predictors of transition to dementia: A multicenter study",
abstract = "Introduction: To report clinical predictors of transition to dementia in motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a predementia syndrome characterized by cognitive complaints and slow gait. Methods: We examined if cognitive or motoric impairments predicted transition to dementia in 610 older adults with MCR from three cohorts. Association of cognitive (logical memory, clinical dementia rating, cognitive complaint severity, and Mini–Mental State Examination) and motoric factors (gait velocity) with dementia risk was computed using Cox models. Results: There were 156 incident dementias (134 Alzheimer's disease). In the pooled sample, logical memory (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.91), cognitive complaint severity (aHR 1.53), and Mini–Mental State Examination (aHR 0.75) predicted transition of MCR to dementia. Clinical dementia rating score ≥0.5 predicted dementia (aHR 3.18) in one cohort. Gait velocity did not predict dementia. Discussion: While MCR is a motoric-based predementia syndrome, severity of cognitive but not motoric impairments predicts conversion to dementia.",
keywords = "Cohort studies, Dementia, Gait disorders, Incidence studies, Motoric cognitive risk syndrome",
author = "Joe Verghese and Cuiling Wang and Bennett, {David A.} and Lipton, {Richard B.} and Katz, {Mindy Joy} and Ayers, {Emmeline I.}",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1016/j.jalz.2019.03.011",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Alzheimer's and Dementia",
issn = "1552-5260",
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T2 - A multicenter study

AU - Verghese, Joe

AU - Wang, Cuiling

AU - Bennett, David A.

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

AU - Ayers, Emmeline I.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Introduction: To report clinical predictors of transition to dementia in motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a predementia syndrome characterized by cognitive complaints and slow gait. Methods: We examined if cognitive or motoric impairments predicted transition to dementia in 610 older adults with MCR from three cohorts. Association of cognitive (logical memory, clinical dementia rating, cognitive complaint severity, and Mini–Mental State Examination) and motoric factors (gait velocity) with dementia risk was computed using Cox models. Results: There were 156 incident dementias (134 Alzheimer's disease). In the pooled sample, logical memory (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.91), cognitive complaint severity (aHR 1.53), and Mini–Mental State Examination (aHR 0.75) predicted transition of MCR to dementia. Clinical dementia rating score ≥0.5 predicted dementia (aHR 3.18) in one cohort. Gait velocity did not predict dementia. Discussion: While MCR is a motoric-based predementia syndrome, severity of cognitive but not motoric impairments predicts conversion to dementia.

AB - Introduction: To report clinical predictors of transition to dementia in motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a predementia syndrome characterized by cognitive complaints and slow gait. Methods: We examined if cognitive or motoric impairments predicted transition to dementia in 610 older adults with MCR from three cohorts. Association of cognitive (logical memory, clinical dementia rating, cognitive complaint severity, and Mini–Mental State Examination) and motoric factors (gait velocity) with dementia risk was computed using Cox models. Results: There were 156 incident dementias (134 Alzheimer's disease). In the pooled sample, logical memory (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.91), cognitive complaint severity (aHR 1.53), and Mini–Mental State Examination (aHR 0.75) predicted transition of MCR to dementia. Clinical dementia rating score ≥0.5 predicted dementia (aHR 3.18) in one cohort. Gait velocity did not predict dementia. Discussion: While MCR is a motoric-based predementia syndrome, severity of cognitive but not motoric impairments predicts conversion to dementia.

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KW - Gait disorders

KW - Incidence studies

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