MOTHER-TO-INFANT TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1: ASSOCIATION WITH PREMATURITY OR LOW ANTI-gp120

JamesJ Goedert, JamesE Drummond, HowardL Minkoff, Roy Stevens, WilliamA Blattner, Hermann Mendez, Marjorie Robert-Guroff, Susan Holman, Arye Rubinstein, Anne Willoughby, SheldonH Landesman

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Abstract

In a prospective study of pregnant women infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Brooklyn, New York, USA, 16 (29%) of 55 evaluable infants were infected with HIV-1. 9 infants had paediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 6 had less severe clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection, and 1 was symptom-free but was seropositive for HIV-1 beyond 15 months of age. The 10 infants born at 37 weeks of gestation or earlier were at higher risk of HIV-1 infection than infants born at 38 weeks of gestation or later (60% vs 22%) but the median age at appearance of disease was approximately 5 months in both groups. The HIV-1 transmission rate was not associated with predelivery levels of maternal T cells, anti-p24, or neutralising antibodies but it was higher, among full-term infants, for those with mothers in the lowest third of the distribution of anti-gp 120 levels (53%). On immunoblot, transmitting mothers lacked a gp120 band but not other bands. Protection was not associated with antibody to recombinant peptides from the hypervariable region of the major neutralising gp120 epitope, and the anti-gp120 endpoint dilution titre was similar in transmitting and non-transmitting mothers. Mothers of uninfected full-term infants appear to confer immunological protection against HIV-1 infection of their offspring by way of a high-affinity antibody to a gp120 epitope, whose specificity has importance for vaccine development and possibly perinatal immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1351-1354
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume334
Issue number8676
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 9 1989

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HIV-1
Mothers
Virus Diseases
Epitopes
X-Linked Combined Immunodeficiency Diseases
Pregnancy
Antibody Affinity
Neutralizing Antibodies
Immunotherapy
Pregnant Women
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Vaccines
Prospective Studies
Pediatrics
T-Lymphocytes
Peptides
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Goedert, J., Drummond, J., Minkoff, H., Stevens, R., Blattner, W., Mendez, H., ... Landesman, S. (1989). MOTHER-TO-INFANT TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1: ASSOCIATION WITH PREMATURITY OR LOW ANTI-gp120. The Lancet, 334(8676), 1351-1354. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(89)91965-X

MOTHER-TO-INFANT TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 : ASSOCIATION WITH PREMATURITY OR LOW ANTI-gp120. / Goedert, JamesJ; Drummond, JamesE; Minkoff, HowardL; Stevens, Roy; Blattner, WilliamA; Mendez, Hermann; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Holman, Susan; Rubinstein, Arye; Willoughby, Anne; Landesman, SheldonH.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 334, No. 8676, 09.12.1989, p. 1351-1354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goedert, J, Drummond, J, Minkoff, H, Stevens, R, Blattner, W, Mendez, H, Robert-Guroff, M, Holman, S, Rubinstein, A, Willoughby, A & Landesman, S 1989, 'MOTHER-TO-INFANT TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1: ASSOCIATION WITH PREMATURITY OR LOW ANTI-gp120', The Lancet, vol. 334, no. 8676, pp. 1351-1354. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(89)91965-X
Goedert, JamesJ ; Drummond, JamesE ; Minkoff, HowardL ; Stevens, Roy ; Blattner, WilliamA ; Mendez, Hermann ; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie ; Holman, Susan ; Rubinstein, Arye ; Willoughby, Anne ; Landesman, SheldonH. / MOTHER-TO-INFANT TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 : ASSOCIATION WITH PREMATURITY OR LOW ANTI-gp120. In: The Lancet. 1989 ; Vol. 334, No. 8676. pp. 1351-1354.
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abstract = "In a prospective study of pregnant women infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Brooklyn, New York, USA, 16 (29{\%}) of 55 evaluable infants were infected with HIV-1. 9 infants had paediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 6 had less severe clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection, and 1 was symptom-free but was seropositive for HIV-1 beyond 15 months of age. The 10 infants born at 37 weeks of gestation or earlier were at higher risk of HIV-1 infection than infants born at 38 weeks of gestation or later (60{\%} vs 22{\%}) but the median age at appearance of disease was approximately 5 months in both groups. The HIV-1 transmission rate was not associated with predelivery levels of maternal T cells, anti-p24, or neutralising antibodies but it was higher, among full-term infants, for those with mothers in the lowest third of the distribution of anti-gp 120 levels (53{\%}). On immunoblot, transmitting mothers lacked a gp120 band but not other bands. Protection was not associated with antibody to recombinant peptides from the hypervariable region of the major neutralising gp120 epitope, and the anti-gp120 endpoint dilution titre was similar in transmitting and non-transmitting mothers. Mothers of uninfected full-term infants appear to confer immunological protection against HIV-1 infection of their offspring by way of a high-affinity antibody to a gp120 epitope, whose specificity has importance for vaccine development and possibly perinatal immunotherapy.",
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