Mortality of heart failure patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy: Identification of predictors

Rong Bai, Luigi Di Biase, Claude Elayi, Chi Keong Ching, Conor Barrett, Karen Philipps, Pascal Lim, Dimpi Patel, Tom Callahan, David O. Martin, Mauricio Arruda, Robert A. Schweikert, Walid I. Saliba, Bruce Wilkoff, Andrea Natale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predictors to Mortality After CRT-P or CRT-D. Introduction: A direct comparison of survival benefits between cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemaker (CRT-P) and defibrillator (CRT-D) was not yet performed, leaving clinicians to question whether CRT-P alone is enough to protect congestive heart failure (CHF) patients from sudden cardiac death and whether CRT-D should be implanted to all CHF patients indicated for biventricular pacing. This study attempts to make this type of comparison in a large CHF population and seeks to identify predictors of death in patients with different comorbidities. Methods and Results: Study population consisted of 542 consecutive patients who were implanted with either CRT-P (N = 147) or CRT-D (N = 395) between 1999 and 2005. Patients' clinical and follow-up data were entered in a prospective registry and retrieved for analysis. The primary endpoint of this study was all-cause mortality during follow-up. Total all-cause mortality was significantly lower among patients with CRT-D (18.5% vs. 38.8% of CRT-P, χ2 = 25.11, P < 0.001). Patients with one of three comorbidities - chronic renal failure (OR = 4.885, P = 0.005), diabetes mellitus (OR = 4.130, P = 0.003), and history of atrial fibrillation (OR = 1.473, P = 0.036) - appeared to have higher risk of death, while treatment with beta-blocker (OR = 0.330, P = 0.002) or CRT-D device (OR = 0.334, P = 0.003) seemed to be associated with lower mortality. Conclusions: Data from this nonrandomized study indicate that CRT-D has additional survival benefits over CRT-P. Given these findings, CRT-D should be recommended to most CHF patients with indications for biventricular pacing. After CRT implant, chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus, and history of atrial fibrillation are strong independent predictors of death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1259-1265
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
Defibrillators
Heart Failure
Mortality
Atrial Fibrillation
Chronic Kidney Failure
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus
Survival
Sudden Cardiac Death
Population
Registries
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Biventricular pacing
  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Implantable cardioverter- defibrillator
  • Mortality
  • Renal failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Mortality of heart failure patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy : Identification of predictors. / Bai, Rong; Di Biase, Luigi; Elayi, Claude; Ching, Chi Keong; Barrett, Conor; Philipps, Karen; Lim, Pascal; Patel, Dimpi; Callahan, Tom; Martin, David O.; Arruda, Mauricio; Schweikert, Robert A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Wilkoff, Bruce; Natale, Andrea.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 19, No. 12, 12.2008, p. 1259-1265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bai, R, Di Biase, L, Elayi, C, Ching, CK, Barrett, C, Philipps, K, Lim, P, Patel, D, Callahan, T, Martin, DO, Arruda, M, Schweikert, RA, Saliba, WI, Wilkoff, B & Natale, A 2008, 'Mortality of heart failure patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy: Identification of predictors', Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, vol. 19, no. 12, pp. 1259-1265. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8167.2008.01234.x
Bai, Rong ; Di Biase, Luigi ; Elayi, Claude ; Ching, Chi Keong ; Barrett, Conor ; Philipps, Karen ; Lim, Pascal ; Patel, Dimpi ; Callahan, Tom ; Martin, David O. ; Arruda, Mauricio ; Schweikert, Robert A. ; Saliba, Walid I. ; Wilkoff, Bruce ; Natale, Andrea. / Mortality of heart failure patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy : Identification of predictors. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. 2008 ; Vol. 19, No. 12. pp. 1259-1265.
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AU - Ching, Chi Keong

AU - Barrett, Conor

AU - Philipps, Karen

AU - Lim, Pascal

AU - Patel, Dimpi

AU - Callahan, Tom

AU - Martin, David O.

AU - Arruda, Mauricio

AU - Schweikert, Robert A.

AU - Saliba, Walid I.

AU - Wilkoff, Bruce

AU - Natale, Andrea

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N2 - Predictors to Mortality After CRT-P or CRT-D. Introduction: A direct comparison of survival benefits between cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemaker (CRT-P) and defibrillator (CRT-D) was not yet performed, leaving clinicians to question whether CRT-P alone is enough to protect congestive heart failure (CHF) patients from sudden cardiac death and whether CRT-D should be implanted to all CHF patients indicated for biventricular pacing. This study attempts to make this type of comparison in a large CHF population and seeks to identify predictors of death in patients with different comorbidities. Methods and Results: Study population consisted of 542 consecutive patients who were implanted with either CRT-P (N = 147) or CRT-D (N = 395) between 1999 and 2005. Patients' clinical and follow-up data were entered in a prospective registry and retrieved for analysis. The primary endpoint of this study was all-cause mortality during follow-up. Total all-cause mortality was significantly lower among patients with CRT-D (18.5% vs. 38.8% of CRT-P, χ2 = 25.11, P < 0.001). Patients with one of three comorbidities - chronic renal failure (OR = 4.885, P = 0.005), diabetes mellitus (OR = 4.130, P = 0.003), and history of atrial fibrillation (OR = 1.473, P = 0.036) - appeared to have higher risk of death, while treatment with beta-blocker (OR = 0.330, P = 0.002) or CRT-D device (OR = 0.334, P = 0.003) seemed to be associated with lower mortality. Conclusions: Data from this nonrandomized study indicate that CRT-D has additional survival benefits over CRT-P. Given these findings, CRT-D should be recommended to most CHF patients with indications for biventricular pacing. After CRT implant, chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus, and history of atrial fibrillation are strong independent predictors of death.

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KW - Cardiac resynchronization therapy

KW - Congestive heart failure

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Implantable cardioverter- defibrillator

KW - Mortality

KW - Renal failure

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