Monoclonal antibodies. A new technology for producing serologic reagents

B. A. Diamond, D. E. Yelton, Matthew D. Scharff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hybridoma technology is not limited to the production of monoclonal antibodies. Although most cell lines developed to date have been B-cell-myeloma hybrids, other cell types may be used to generate useful hybrids. Hybrid lines secreting immunoregulatory molecules have already been reported. By choosing a malignant cell that does not extinguish the desired property of the primary cell, one may be able to establish lines secreting a wide range of products that are not easily obtained from primary tissues. Furthermore, it may be possible to generate hybrid cell lines that retain the functional activities of primary cells. Because these lines are homogeneous and can be grown in large quantitites, it may be possible to study the molecular mechanims of biologic activities. Such experiments are extremely difficult at present, because even 'purified' primary cells are generally contaminated with other cell types and usually cnnot be obtained in sufficiently large number for molecular. A variety of very basic and somewhat esoteric studies have led to a technology for porducing large amounts of homogeneous antibodies against a wide variety of antigens. This technology has not only improved the quality and discreminating power of diagnostic and investigative serology, but it also promises to provide new reagents that will be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of many disease processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1344-1349
Number of pages6
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume304
Issue number22
StatePublished - 1981

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Monoclonal Antibodies
Technology
Hybrid Cells
Cell Line
Hybridomas
Serology
B-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Monoclonal antibodies. A new technology for producing serologic reagents. / Diamond, B. A.; Yelton, D. E.; Scharff, Matthew D.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 304, No. 22, 1981, p. 1344-1349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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