Molecular pathways: Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for human cancer immunotherapy

Elodie Picarda, Kim C. Ohaegbulam, Xingxing Zang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

B7-H3 (CD276) is an important immune checkpoint member of the B7 and CD28 families. Induced on antigen-presenting cells, B7-H3 plays an important role in the inhibition of T-cell function. Importantly, B7-H3 is highly overexpressed on a wide range of human solid cancers and often correlates with both negative prognosis and poor clinical outcome in patients. Challenges remain to identify the receptor(s) of B7-H3 and thus better elucidate the role of the B7-H3 pathway in immune responses and tumor evasion. With a preferential expression on tumor cells, B7-H3 is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Based on the clinical success of inhibitory immune checkpoint blockade (CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1), mAbs against B7-H3 appear to be a promising therapeutic strategy worthy of development. An unconventional mAb against B7-H3 with antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial and has shown encouraging preliminary results. Additional therapeutic approaches in targeting B7-H3, such as blocking mAbs, bispecific mAbs, chimeric antigen receptor T cells, small-molecule inhibitors, and combination therapies, should be evaluated, as these technologies have already shown positive results in various cancer settings. A better understanding of the B7-H3 pathway in humans will surely help to further optimize associated cancer immunotherapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3425-3431
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume22
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2016

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Immunotherapy
Neoplasms
Tumor Escape
Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Antigen-Presenting Cells
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Therapeutics
Technology
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Molecular pathways : Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for human cancer immunotherapy. / Picarda, Elodie; Ohaegbulam, Kim C.; Zang, Xingxing.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 22, No. 14, 15.07.2016, p. 3425-3431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Picarda, Elodie ; Ohaegbulam, Kim C. ; Zang, Xingxing. / Molecular pathways : Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for human cancer immunotherapy. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 14. pp. 3425-3431.
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