Mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI)

High-density electrical mapping of inhibitory processes during walking.

Pierfilippo De Sanctis, John S. Butler, Jason M. Green, Adam C. Snyder, John J. Foxe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.

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Neuroimaging
Walking
Brain
Imaging techniques
Evoked Potentials
Exercise equipment
Feasibility Studies
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Gait
Signal to noise ratio
Technology
Testing
Research
Population
Walking Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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title = "Mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI): High-density electrical mapping of inhibitory processes during walking.",
abstract = "The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.",
author = "{De Sanctis}, Pierfilippo and Butler, {John S.} and Green, {Jason M.} and Snyder, {Adam C.} and Foxe, {John J.}",
year = "2012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2012",
pages = "1542--1545",
journal = "Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference",
issn = "1557-170X",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

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T1 - Mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI)

T2 - High-density electrical mapping of inhibitory processes during walking.

AU - De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

AU - Butler, John S.

AU - Green, Jason M.

AU - Snyder, Adam C.

AU - Foxe, John J.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.

AB - The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.

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