Mitosis in Neurons

Roughex and APC/C Maintain Cell Cycle Exit to Prevent Cytokinetic and Axonal Defects in Drosophila Photoreceptor Neurons

Robert Ruggiero, Abhijit Kale, Barbara Thomas, Nicholas E. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanisms of cell cycle exit by neurons remain poorly understood. Through genetic and developmental analysis of Drosophila eye development, we found that the cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitor Roughex maintains G1 cell cycle exit during differentiation of the R8 class of photoreceptor neurons. The roughex mutant neurons re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and progress without executing cytokinesis, unlike non-neuronal cells in the roughex mutant that perform complete cell divisions. After mitosis, the binucleated R8 neurons usually transport one daughter nucleus away from the cell body into the developing axon towards the brain in a kinesin-dependent manner resembling anterograde axonal trafficking. Similar cell cycle and photoreceptor neuron defects occurred in mutants for components of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome. These findings indicate a neuron-specific defect in cytokinesis and demonstrate a critical role for mitotic cyclin downregulation both to maintain cell cycle exit during neuronal differentiation and to prevent axonal defects following failed cytokinesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1003049
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Fingerprint

photoreceptors
Mitosis
mitosis
Drosophila
defect
cell cycle
Cell Cycle
neurons
Neurons
Cytokinesis
cytokinesis
trafficking
mutants
brain
inhibitor
Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome
Kinesin
kinesin
Cyclins
cyclin-dependent kinase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Mitosis in Neurons : Roughex and APC/C Maintain Cell Cycle Exit to Prevent Cytokinetic and Axonal Defects in Drosophila Photoreceptor Neurons. / Ruggiero, Robert; Kale, Abhijit; Thomas, Barbara; Baker, Nicholas E.

In: PLoS Genetics, Vol. 8, No. 11, e1003049, 11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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