Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cesarean Scar and Cervical Pregnancies Using a Cervical Ripening Double Balloon Catheter: Expanding the Clinical Series

Ana Monteagudo, Giuseppe Calì, Andrei Rebarber, Marcos Cordoba, Nathan S. Fox, Eran Bornstein, Peer Dar, Anthony Johnson, Mark Rebolos, Ilan E. Timor-Tritsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The efficacy of treating cesarean scar pregnancies and cervical pregnancies with the Cook® cervical ripening balloon catheter, in a multicenter office-based setting is reported. Thirty-eight women were treated. Insertion of the catheter was performed under real-time ultrasound guidance. Patients received adjuvant systemic methotrexate, prophylactic oral antibiotics, and oral pain medication. Serum human chorionic gonadotropin and ultrasound scans were followed serially until resolution. Thirty-seven patients were successfully treated, requiring no further procedures. We found that the Cook cervical ripening balloon technique is a simple, effective, outpatient, minimally invasive treatment with few complications noted in this expanded series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-793
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • cervical pregnancy
  • cesarean scar pregnancy
  • double balloon
  • minimally invasive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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    Monteagudo, A., Calì, G., Rebarber, A., Cordoba, M., Fox, N. S., Bornstein, E., Dar, P., Johnson, A., Rebolos, M., & Timor-Tritsch, I. E. (2019). Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cesarean Scar and Cervical Pregnancies Using a Cervical Ripening Double Balloon Catheter: Expanding the Clinical Series. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 38(3), 785-793. https://doi.org/10.1002/jum.14736