Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa

Steven A. Abrams, Tomas J. Silber, Nora V. Esteban, Nancy E. Vieira, Janice E. Stuff, Robin Meyers, Massoud Majd, Alfred L. Yergey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We evaluated seven female adolescents with anorexia nervosa to determine whether calcium metabolism was affected by their disorder. We measured calcium absorption, urinary calcium excretion, and calcium kinetics, using a dualtracer, stable-isotope technique during the first weeks of an inpatient nutritional rehabilitation program. Results were compared with those from a control group of seven healthy adolescent girls of similar ages. The percentage of absorption of calcium was lower in subjects with anorexia nervosa than in control subjects (16.2%±6.3% vs 24.6%±7.2%; p<0.05). Urinary calcium excretion was greater in subjects with anorexia nervosa than in control subjects (6.4±2.5 vs 1.6±0.7 mg·kg-1·day-1; p<0.01) and was associated with bone resorption rather than calcium hyperabsorption. Calcium kinetic studies demonstrated a decreased rate of bone formation and an increased rate of bone resorption. These results suggest marked abnormalities in mineral metabolism in patients with anorexia nervosa. From these results, we hypothesize that improvement in bone mineralization during recovery from anorexia nervosa will require resolution of hormonal abnormalities, including hypercortisolism, in addition to increased calcium intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-331
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Bone Remodeling
Anorexia Nervosa
Minerals
Calcium
Bone Resorption
Physiologic Calcification
Cushing Syndrome
Osteogenesis
Isotopes
Inpatients
Rehabilitation
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Abrams, S. A., Silber, T. J., Esteban, N. V., Vieira, N. E., Stuff, J. E., Meyers, R., ... Yergey, A. L. (1993). Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. The Journal of Pediatrics, 123(2), 326-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(05)81714-7

Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. / Abrams, Steven A.; Silber, Tomas J.; Esteban, Nora V.; Vieira, Nancy E.; Stuff, Janice E.; Meyers, Robin; Majd, Massoud; Yergey, Alfred L.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 123, No. 2, 1993, p. 326-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abrams, SA, Silber, TJ, Esteban, NV, Vieira, NE, Stuff, JE, Meyers, R, Majd, M & Yergey, AL 1993, 'Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa', The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 123, no. 2, pp. 326-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(05)81714-7
Abrams SA, Silber TJ, Esteban NV, Vieira NE, Stuff JE, Meyers R et al. Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. The Journal of Pediatrics. 1993;123(2):326-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(05)81714-7
Abrams, Steven A. ; Silber, Tomas J. ; Esteban, Nora V. ; Vieira, Nancy E. ; Stuff, Janice E. ; Meyers, Robin ; Majd, Massoud ; Yergey, Alfred L. / Mineral balance and bone turnover in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. In: The Journal of Pediatrics. 1993 ; Vol. 123, No. 2. pp. 326-331.
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