Metabolic syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women: a prospective study

Rhonda S. Arthur, Geoffrey C. Kabat, Mimi Kim, Robert A. Wild, Aladdin H. Shadyab, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Gloria Y.F. Ho, Katherine W. Reeves, Lewis H. Kuller, Juhua Luo, Jennifer Beebe-Dimmer, Michael S. Simon, Howard Strickler, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Thomas E. Rohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Obesity is a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) contributes to endometrial cancer risk over and above the contribution of obesity. Methods: We examined the association of MetS and its components with risk of endometrial cancer in a sub-cohort of 24,210 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative cohort study. Two variants of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition of the MetS were used: one including and one excluding waist circumference (WC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of the study exposures with disease risk. Results: When WC was included in the definition, MetS showed an approximately two-fold increase in endometrial cancer risk (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.61–3.02); however, when WC was excluded, MetS was no longer associated with risk. We also observed that women with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, in combination, had almost a twofold increased risk of endometrial cancer, independent of WC (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.09, 3.46). Glucose, and, in particular, WC and body mass index were also positively associated with risk. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MetS may predict risk of endometrial cancer independent of obesity among women with the remaining four Mets components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Causes and Control
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Endometrial Neoplasms
Prospective Studies
Waist Circumference
Obesity
Women's Health
Dyslipidemias
Proportional Hazards Models
Hyperglycemia
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Cholesterol
Hypertension
Education
Glucose

Keywords

  • Abdominal adiposity
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Postmenopausal women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Metabolic syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women : a prospective study. / Arthur, Rhonda S.; Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Kim, Mimi; Wild, Robert A.; Shadyab, Aladdin H.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ho, Gloria Y.F.; Reeves, Katherine W.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Luo, Juhua; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Simon, Michael S.; Strickler, Howard; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Rohan, Thomas E.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arthur, RS, Kabat, GC, Kim, M, Wild, RA, Shadyab, AH, Wactawski-Wende, J, Ho, GYF, Reeves, KW, Kuller, LH, Luo, J, Beebe-Dimmer, J, Simon, MS, Strickler, H, Wassertheil-Smoller, S & Rohan, TE 2019, 'Metabolic syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women: a prospective study', Cancer Causes and Control. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-019-01139-5
Arthur, Rhonda S. ; Kabat, Geoffrey C. ; Kim, Mimi ; Wild, Robert A. ; Shadyab, Aladdin H. ; Wactawski-Wende, Jean ; Ho, Gloria Y.F. ; Reeves, Katherine W. ; Kuller, Lewis H. ; Luo, Juhua ; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer ; Simon, Michael S. ; Strickler, Howard ; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia ; Rohan, Thomas E. / Metabolic syndrome and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women : a prospective study. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: Obesity is a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) contributes to endometrial cancer risk over and above the contribution of obesity. Methods: We examined the association of MetS and its components with risk of endometrial cancer in a sub-cohort of 24,210 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative cohort study. Two variants of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition of the MetS were used: one including and one excluding waist circumference (WC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of the study exposures with disease risk. Results: When WC was included in the definition, MetS showed an approximately two-fold increase in endometrial cancer risk (HR 2.20; 95{\%} CI 1.61–3.02); however, when WC was excluded, MetS was no longer associated with risk. We also observed that women with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, in combination, had almost a twofold increased risk of endometrial cancer, independent of WC (HR 1.94; 95{\%} CI 1.09, 3.46). Glucose, and, in particular, WC and body mass index were also positively associated with risk. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MetS may predict risk of endometrial cancer independent of obesity among women with the remaining four Mets components.",
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T2 - a prospective study

AU - Arthur, Rhonda S.

AU - Kabat, Geoffrey C.

AU - Kim, Mimi

AU - Wild, Robert A.

AU - Shadyab, Aladdin H.

AU - Wactawski-Wende, Jean

AU - Ho, Gloria Y.F.

AU - Reeves, Katherine W.

AU - Kuller, Lewis H.

AU - Luo, Juhua

AU - Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer

AU - Simon, Michael S.

AU - Strickler, Howard

AU - Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

AU - Rohan, Thomas E.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Obesity is a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) contributes to endometrial cancer risk over and above the contribution of obesity. Methods: We examined the association of MetS and its components with risk of endometrial cancer in a sub-cohort of 24,210 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative cohort study. Two variants of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition of the MetS were used: one including and one excluding waist circumference (WC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of the study exposures with disease risk. Results: When WC was included in the definition, MetS showed an approximately two-fold increase in endometrial cancer risk (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.61–3.02); however, when WC was excluded, MetS was no longer associated with risk. We also observed that women with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, in combination, had almost a twofold increased risk of endometrial cancer, independent of WC (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.09, 3.46). Glucose, and, in particular, WC and body mass index were also positively associated with risk. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MetS may predict risk of endometrial cancer independent of obesity among women with the remaining four Mets components.

AB - Background: Obesity is a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) contributes to endometrial cancer risk over and above the contribution of obesity. Methods: We examined the association of MetS and its components with risk of endometrial cancer in a sub-cohort of 24,210 women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative cohort study. Two variants of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition of the MetS were used: one including and one excluding waist circumference (WC). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association of the study exposures with disease risk. Results: When WC was included in the definition, MetS showed an approximately two-fold increase in endometrial cancer risk (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.61–3.02); however, when WC was excluded, MetS was no longer associated with risk. We also observed that women with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, in combination, had almost a twofold increased risk of endometrial cancer, independent of WC (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.09, 3.46). Glucose, and, in particular, WC and body mass index were also positively associated with risk. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MetS may predict risk of endometrial cancer independent of obesity among women with the remaining four Mets components.

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