Melatonin receptor activation provides cerebral protection after traumatic brain injury by mitigating oxidative stress and inflammation via the Nrf2 signaling pathway

Junmin Wang, Chao Jiang, Kun Zhang, Xi Lan, Xuemei Chen, Weidong Zang, Zhongyu Wang, Fangxia Guan, Changlian Zhu, Xiuli Yang, Hong Lu, Jian Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a principal cause of death and disability worldwide. Melatonin, a hormone made by the pineal gland, is known to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this study, using a weight-drop model of TBI, we investigated the protective effects of ramelteon, a melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor agonist, and its underlying mechanisms of action. Administration of ramelteon (10 mg/kg) daily at 10:00 a.m. alleviated TBI-induced early brain damage on day 3 and long-term neurobehavioral deficits on day 28 in C57BL/6 mice. Ramelteon also increased the protein levels of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase and reduced the protein levels of IL-1β tumor necrosis factor, and malondialdehyde in brain tissue and serum on days 1, 3, and 7 post-TBI. Similarly, ramelteon attenuated microglial and astrocyte activation in the perilesional cortex on day 3. Furthermore, ramelteon decreased Keap 1 expression, promoted nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear accumulation, and increased levels of downstream proteins, including SOD-1, heme oxygenase-1, and NQO1 on day 3 post-TBI. However, in Nrf2 knockout mice with TBI, ramelteon did not decrease the lesion volume, neuronal degeneration, or myelin loss on day 3; nor did it mitigate depression-like behavior or most motor behavior deficits on day 28. Thus, timed ramelteon treatment appears to prevent inflammation and oxidative stress via the Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway and might represent a potential chronotherapeutic strategy for treating TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-355
Number of pages11
JournalFree Radical Biology and Medicine
Volume131
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Melatonin Receptors
Oxidative stress
Brain
Oxidative Stress
Chemical activation
Inflammation
Melatonin
Melatonin MT1 Receptor
Melatonin MT2 Receptor
Antioxidant Response Elements
Superoxide Dismutase
Proteins
Heme Oxygenase-1
Pineal Gland
Myelin Sheath
Glutathione Peroxidase
ramelteon
Traumatic Brain Injury
Malondialdehyde
Interleukin-1

Keywords

  • Chronotherapy
  • Inflammation
  • NF-E2-related factor
  • Oxidative stress
  • Ramelteon
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Melatonin receptor activation provides cerebral protection after traumatic brain injury by mitigating oxidative stress and inflammation via the Nrf2 signaling pathway. / Wang, Junmin; Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Kun; Lan, Xi; Chen, Xuemei; Zang, Weidong; Wang, Zhongyu; Guan, Fangxia; Zhu, Changlian; Yang, Xiuli; Lu, Hong; Wang, Jian.

In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Vol. 131, 01.02.2019, p. 345-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Junmin ; Jiang, Chao ; Zhang, Kun ; Lan, Xi ; Chen, Xuemei ; Zang, Weidong ; Wang, Zhongyu ; Guan, Fangxia ; Zhu, Changlian ; Yang, Xiuli ; Lu, Hong ; Wang, Jian. / Melatonin receptor activation provides cerebral protection after traumatic brain injury by mitigating oxidative stress and inflammation via the Nrf2 signaling pathway. In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 131. pp. 345-355.
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AU - Zang, Weidong

AU - Wang, Zhongyu

AU - Guan, Fangxia

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AU - Yang, Xiuli

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AU - Wang, Jian

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