Melanin, radiation, and energy transduction in fungi

Arturo Casadevall, Radames J B Cordero, Ruth Bryan, Joshua D. Nosanchuk, Ekaterina Dadachova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Melanin pigments are found in many diverse fungal species, where they serve a variety of functions that promote fitness and cell survival. Melanotic fungi inhabit some of the most extreme habitats on earth such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl and the highlands of Antarctica, both of which are high-radiation environments. Melanotic fungi migrate toward radioactive sources, which appear to enhance their growth. This phenomenon, combined with the known capacities of melanin to absorb a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and transduce this radiation into other forms of energy, raises the possibility that melanin also functions in harvesting such energy for biological usage. The ability of melanotic fungi to harness electromagnetic radiation for physiological processes has enormous implications for biological energy flows in the biosphere and for exobiology, since it provides new mechanisms for survival in extraterrestrial conditions. Whereas some features of the way melanin-related energy transduction works can be discerned by linking various observations and circumstantial data, the mechanistic details remain to be discovered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberFUNK-0037-2016
JournalMicrobiology spectrum
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

melanin
Melanins
Fungi
fungus
Radiation
Electromagnetic Radiation
electromagnetic radiation
energy
Exobiology
exobiology
Nuclear Reactors
Physiological Phenomena
energy flow
biosphere
Ecosystem
pigment
Cell Survival
fitness
radiation
habitat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Ecology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Casadevall, A., Cordero, R. J. B., Bryan, R., Nosanchuk, J. D., & Dadachova, E. (2017). Melanin, radiation, and energy transduction in fungi. Microbiology spectrum, 5(2), [FUNK-0037-2016]. https://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.FUNK-0037-2016

Melanin, radiation, and energy transduction in fungi. / Casadevall, Arturo; Cordero, Radames J B; Bryan, Ruth; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Dadachova, Ekaterina.

In: Microbiology spectrum, Vol. 5, No. 2, FUNK-0037-2016, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Casadevall, A, Cordero, RJB, Bryan, R, Nosanchuk, JD & Dadachova, E 2017, 'Melanin, radiation, and energy transduction in fungi', Microbiology spectrum, vol. 5, no. 2, FUNK-0037-2016. https://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.FUNK-0037-2016
Casadevall, Arturo ; Cordero, Radames J B ; Bryan, Ruth ; Nosanchuk, Joshua D. ; Dadachova, Ekaterina. / Melanin, radiation, and energy transduction in fungi. In: Microbiology spectrum. 2017 ; Vol. 5, No. 2.
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