Medical bioremediation

Prospects for the application of microbial catabolic diversity to aging and several major age-related diseases

Aubrey D N J De Grey, Pedro J J Alvarez, Roscoe O. Brady, Ana Maria Cuervo, W. Gray Jerome, Perry L. McCarty, Ralph A. Nixon, Bruce E. Rittmann, Janet R. Sparrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several major diseases of old age, including atherosclerosis, macular degeneration and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with the intracellular accumulation of substances that impair cellular function and viability. Moreover, the accumulation of lipofuscin, a substance that may have similarly deleterious effects, is one of the most universal markers of aging in postmitotic cells. Reversing this accumulation may thus be valuable, but has proven challenging, doubtless because substances resistant to cellular catabolism are inherently hard to degrade. We suggest a radically new approach: augmenting humans' natural catabolic machinery with microbial enzymes. Many recalcitrant organic molecules are naturally degraded in the soil. Since the soil in certain environments - graveyards, for example - is enriched in human remains but does not accumulate these substances, it presumably harbours microbes that degrade them. The enzymes responsible could be identified and engineered to metabolise these substances in vivo. Here, we survey a range of such substances, their putative roles in age-related diseases and the possible benefits of their removal. We discuss how microbes capable of degrading them can be isolated, characterised and their relevant enzymes engineered for this purpose and ways to avoid potential side-effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-338
Number of pages24
JournalAgeing Research Reviews
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

Fingerprint

Environmental Biodegradation
Bioremediation
Aging of materials
Enzymes
Soil
Cemeteries
Neurodegenerative diseases
Soils
Lipofuscin
Macular Degeneration
Ports and harbors
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Machinery
Atherosclerosis
Molecules

Keywords

  • Aggregates
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Bacteria
  • Bioremediation
  • Catabolism
  • Lysosomes
  • Macular degeneration
  • Neurodegeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Medical bioremediation : Prospects for the application of microbial catabolic diversity to aging and several major age-related diseases. / De Grey, Aubrey D N J; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Brady, Roscoe O.; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Jerome, W. Gray; McCarty, Perry L.; Nixon, Ralph A.; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Sparrow, Janet R.

In: Ageing Research Reviews, Vol. 4, No. 3, 08.2005, p. 315-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Grey, ADNJ, Alvarez, PJJ, Brady, RO, Cuervo, AM, Jerome, WG, McCarty, PL, Nixon, RA, Rittmann, BE & Sparrow, JR 2005, 'Medical bioremediation: Prospects for the application of microbial catabolic diversity to aging and several major age-related diseases', Ageing Research Reviews, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 315-338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arr.2005.03.008
De Grey, Aubrey D N J ; Alvarez, Pedro J J ; Brady, Roscoe O. ; Cuervo, Ana Maria ; Jerome, W. Gray ; McCarty, Perry L. ; Nixon, Ralph A. ; Rittmann, Bruce E. ; Sparrow, Janet R. / Medical bioremediation : Prospects for the application of microbial catabolic diversity to aging and several major age-related diseases. In: Ageing Research Reviews. 2005 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 315-338.
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