Mechanical loading, cartilage degradation, and arthritis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Joint tissues are exquisitely sensitive to their mechanical environment, and mechanical loading may be the most important external factor regulating the development and long-term maintenance of joint tissues. Moderate mechanical loading maintains the integrity of articular cartilage; however, both disuse and overuse can result in cartilage degradation. The irreversible destruction of cartilage is the hallmark of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In these instances of cartilage breakdown, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases (ADAMTSs), enzymes that can degrade components of the cartilage extracellular matrix. In order to prevent cartilage destruction, tremendous effort has been expended to design inhibitors of MMP/ADAMTS activity and/or synthesis. To date, however, no effective clinical inhibitors exist. Accumulating evidence suggests that physiologic joint loading helps maintain cartilage integrity; however, the mechanisms by which these mechanical stimuli regulate joint homeostasis are still being elucidated. Identifying mechanosensitive chondroprotective pathways may reveal novel targets or therapeutic strategies in preventing cartilage destruction in joint disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-50
Number of pages14
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1211
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Arthritis
Degradation
Joints
Tissue
Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
Joint Diseases
Articular Cartilage
Destruction
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Interleukin-1beta
Osteoarthritis
Extracellular Matrix
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Homeostasis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Cytokines
Integrity
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Cartilage degradation
  • Mechanical loading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Mechanical loading, cartilage degradation, and arthritis. / Sun, Hui (Herb).

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1211, 11.2010, p. 37-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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