Meat consumption and pancreatic cancer risk among men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

Marjorie L. McCullough, Eric J. Jacobs, Roma Shah, Peter T. Campbell, Ying Wang, Terryl J. Hartman, Susan M. Gapstur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Prospective cohort studies suggest that red and processed meat consumption is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among men, but not women. However, evidence is limited, and less evidence exists for other types of meat. Methods: Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for the association of meat consumption, by type, with pancreatic cancer risk among 138,266 men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Diet was assessed at baseline in 1992, and 10 years earlier, at enrollment into the parent CPS-II mortality cohort. 1,156 pancreatic cancers were verified through 2013. Results: Red meat, processed meat, and fish intake at baseline were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. However, for long-term red and processed meat consumption (highest quartiles in 1982 and 1992, vs. lowest quartiles), risk appeared different in men [hazard ratio (HR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90, 1.95] and women (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.47, 1.10, p heterogeneity by sex = 0.05). Poultry consumption in 1992 was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk (HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.04, 1.55, p trend = 0.01, top vs. bottom quintile). Conclusions: The associations of meat consumption with pancreatic cancer risk remain unclear and further research, particularly of long-term intake, is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Meat
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Processed meat
  • Prospective cohort study
  • Red meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Meat consumption and pancreatic cancer risk among men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this