MDR-TB patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Cost-effectiveness of 5 models of care

Marian Loveday, Kristina Wallengren, Tarylee Reddy, Donela Besada, James C.M. Brust, Anna Voce, Harsha Desai, Jacqueline Ngozo, Zanele Radebe, Iqbal Master, Nesri Padayatchi, Emmanuelle Daviaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background South Africa has a high burden of MDR-TB, and to provide accessible treatment the government has introduced different models of care. We report the most cost-effective model after comparing cost per patient successfully treated across 5 models of care: centralized hospital, district hospitals (2), and community-based care through clinics or mobile injection teams. Methods In an observational study five cohorts were followed prospectively. The cost analysis adopted a provider perspective and economic cost per patient successfully treated was calculated based on country protocols and length of treatment per patient per model of care. Logistic regression was used to calculate propensity score weights, to compare pairs of treatment groups, whilst adjusting for baseline imbalances between groups. Propensity score weighted costs and treatment success rates were used in the ICER analysis. Sensitivity analysis focused on varying treatment success and length of hospitalization within each model. Results In 1,038 MDR-TB patients 75% were HIV-infected and 56% were successfully treated. The cost per successfully treated patient was 3 to 4.5 times lower in the community-based models with no hospitalization. Overall, the Mobile model was the most cost-effective. Conclusion Reducing the length of hospitalization and following community-based models of care improves the affordability of MDR-TB treatment without compromising its effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0196003
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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cost effectiveness
Cost effectiveness
South Africa
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Propensity Score
Hospitalization
Costs
Mobile Health Units
District Hospitals
affordability
Therapeutics
Clinical Protocols
Health Care Costs
cost analysis
economic costs
Observational Studies
observational studies
Logistic Models
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Loveday, M., Wallengren, K., Reddy, T., Besada, D., Brust, J. C. M., Voce, A., ... Daviaud, E. (2018). MDR-TB patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Cost-effectiveness of 5 models of care. PLoS One, 13(4), [e0196003]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196003

MDR-TB patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa : Cost-effectiveness of 5 models of care. / Loveday, Marian; Wallengren, Kristina; Reddy, Tarylee; Besada, Donela; Brust, James C.M.; Voce, Anna; Desai, Harsha; Ngozo, Jacqueline; Radebe, Zanele; Master, Iqbal; Padayatchi, Nesri; Daviaud, Emmanuelle.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 4, e0196003, 01.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loveday, M, Wallengren, K, Reddy, T, Besada, D, Brust, JCM, Voce, A, Desai, H, Ngozo, J, Radebe, Z, Master, I, Padayatchi, N & Daviaud, E 2018, 'MDR-TB patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Cost-effectiveness of 5 models of care', PLoS One, vol. 13, no. 4, e0196003. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196003
Loveday, Marian ; Wallengren, Kristina ; Reddy, Tarylee ; Besada, Donela ; Brust, James C.M. ; Voce, Anna ; Desai, Harsha ; Ngozo, Jacqueline ; Radebe, Zanele ; Master, Iqbal ; Padayatchi, Nesri ; Daviaud, Emmanuelle. / MDR-TB patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa : Cost-effectiveness of 5 models of care. In: PLoS One. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 4.
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