Maximal Rate of Tachycardia Development: Sinus Tachycardia with Sudden Exercise vs. Spontaneous Ventricular Tachycardia

JOHN D. FISHER, MARK GOLDSTEIN, ELIOT OSTROW, JEFFREY A. MATOS, SOO G. KIM

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

In addition to providing basic physiologic information, knowledge of the maximal rate of sinus tachycardia development may be helpful in developing algorithms permitting new generations of antitachycardia pacemakers to distinguish accurately between sinus and ventricular tachycardia. To determine the maximal rate of sinus tachycardia development, 50 normal subjects rushed up 100 stairs as rapidly as possible, with continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. During the first second of exercise, the mean cardiac cycle length shortened from 709 to 570 ms, equivalent to an increase in heart rate from 85 to 105 beats per minute, or 20 beats per minute per second. Thereafter, a more gradual decrease in cycle length occurred. Differences between men and women, smokers and non‐smokers, and sedentary compared to active subjects were all insignificant. Analysis of 50 spontaneous episodes of ventricular tachycardia also revealed a sequential but more abrupt decrease in the cycle length during the first second from 757 to 360 ms, equivalent to a rate increase from 79 to 167 beats per minute, or 88 beats per minute per second. After approximately 1 1/4 seconds, the ventricular tachycardia cycle length remained virtually constant. Baseline cycle lengths were similar in the sinus and ventricular tachycardia groups, but differed in all subsequent beats, although overlap for individual subjects did occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-228
Number of pages8
JournalPacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1983

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Keywords

  • antitachycardia pacemakers
  • exercise testing
  • sinus tachycardia
  • ventricular tachycardia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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