Maternal plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA level

A determinant and projected threshold for mother-to-child transmission

Guowei Fang, Harold Burger, Roger Grimson, Pamela Tropper, Sharon Nachman, Douglas Mayers, Owen Weislow, Rosalyn Moore, Christine Reyelt, Nancy Hutcheon, David Baker, Barbara Weiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To prevent mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission, it is important to identify its determinants. Because HIV-1 RNA levels can be reduced by antiviral therapy, we examined the rule of maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level in mother-to-child transmission. We used quantitative competitive PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA in 30 infected pregnant women and then followed their infants prospectively; 27% of the women transmitted HIV-1 to their infants and maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level correlated strikingly with transmission. Eight of the 10 women with the highest HIV-1 RNA levels at delivery (190,400-1,664,100 copies per ml of plasma) transmitted, while none of the 20 women with lower levels (500-155,800 copies per ml) did (P = 0.0002). Statistical analysis of the distribution of HIV-1 RNA loads in these 30 women projected a threshold for mother-to-child transmission in a larger population; the probability of a woman with a vital RNA level of ≤ 100,000 copies per ml not transmitting is predicted to be 97%. Examination of serial HIV-1 RNA levels during pregnancy showed that viral load was stable in women who did not initiate or change antiviral therapy. These data identify maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level as a major determinant of mother-to-child transmission and suggest that quantitation of HIV-1 RNA may predict the risk of transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12100-12104
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume92
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 19 1995
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-1
Mothers
RNA
Antiviral Agents
Statistical Distributions
Viral Load
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • perinatal infection
  • quantitative competitive PCR
  • vertical transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Maternal plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA level : A determinant and projected threshold for mother-to-child transmission. / Fang, Guowei; Burger, Harold; Grimson, Roger; Tropper, Pamela; Nachman, Sharon; Mayers, Douglas; Weislow, Owen; Moore, Rosalyn; Reyelt, Christine; Hutcheon, Nancy; Baker, David; Weiser, Barbara.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 92, No. 26, 19.12.1995, p. 12100-12104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fang, G, Burger, H, Grimson, R, Tropper, P, Nachman, S, Mayers, D, Weislow, O, Moore, R, Reyelt, C, Hutcheon, N, Baker, D & Weiser, B 1995, 'Maternal plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA level: A determinant and projected threshold for mother-to-child transmission', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 92, no. 26, pp. 12100-12104. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.92.26.12100
Fang, Guowei ; Burger, Harold ; Grimson, Roger ; Tropper, Pamela ; Nachman, Sharon ; Mayers, Douglas ; Weislow, Owen ; Moore, Rosalyn ; Reyelt, Christine ; Hutcheon, Nancy ; Baker, David ; Weiser, Barbara. / Maternal plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA level : A determinant and projected threshold for mother-to-child transmission. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1995 ; Vol. 92, No. 26. pp. 12100-12104.
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