Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor without an identified indication

Sascha Dublin, Mona Lydon-Rochelle, Robert C. Kaplan, D. Heather Watts, Cathy W. Critchlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to examine associations between induction of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women without an identified indication for induction. STUDY DESIGN: This was a population-based cohort study of 2886 women with induced labor and 9648 women with spontaneous labor who were delivered at 37 to 41 weeks' gestation, all without identified medical and obstetric indications for induction. RESULTS: Among nulliparous women 19% of women with induced labor versus 10% of those with spontaneous labor underwent cesarean delivery (adjusted relative risk, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-2.08). No association was seen in multiparous women (relative risk, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.39). Among all women induction was associated with modest increases in instrumental delivery (19% vs 15%; relative risk, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.32) and shoulder dystocia (3.0% vs 1.7%; relative risk, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.69). CONCLUSION: Among women who lacked an identified indication for induction of labor, induction was associated with increased likelihood of cesarean delivery for nulliparous but not multiparous women and with modest increases in the risk of instrumental delivery and shoulder dystocia for all women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)986-994
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume183
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Induced Labor
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Dystocia
Obstetrics
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Cesarean delivery
  • Induction of labor
  • Instrumental delivery
  • Shoulder dystocia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor without an identified indication. / Dublin, Sascha; Lydon-Rochelle, Mona; Kaplan, Robert C.; Watts, D. Heather; Critchlow, Cathy W.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 183, No. 4, 2000, p. 986-994.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dublin, Sascha ; Lydon-Rochelle, Mona ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Watts, D. Heather ; Critchlow, Cathy W. / Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor without an identified indication. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2000 ; Vol. 183, No. 4. pp. 986-994.
@article{2253dc5eb204467397f09e8dbda657bb,
title = "Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor without an identified indication",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to examine associations between induction of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women without an identified indication for induction. STUDY DESIGN: This was a population-based cohort study of 2886 women with induced labor and 9648 women with spontaneous labor who were delivered at 37 to 41 weeks' gestation, all without identified medical and obstetric indications for induction. RESULTS: Among nulliparous women 19{\%} of women with induced labor versus 10{\%} of those with spontaneous labor underwent cesarean delivery (adjusted relative risk, 1.77; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.50-2.08). No association was seen in multiparous women (relative risk, 1.07; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.81-1.39). Among all women induction was associated with modest increases in instrumental delivery (19{\%} vs 15{\%}; relative risk, 1.20; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.09-1.32) and shoulder dystocia (3.0{\%} vs 1.7{\%}; relative risk, 1.32; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.02-1.69). CONCLUSION: Among women who lacked an identified indication for induction of labor, induction was associated with increased likelihood of cesarean delivery for nulliparous but not multiparous women and with modest increases in the risk of instrumental delivery and shoulder dystocia for all women.",
keywords = "Cesarean delivery, Induction of labor, Instrumental delivery, Shoulder dystocia",
author = "Sascha Dublin and Mona Lydon-Rochelle and Kaplan, {Robert C.} and Watts, {D. Heather} and Critchlow, {Cathy W.}",
year = "2000",
doi = "10.1067/mob.2000.106748",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "183",
pages = "986--994",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal and neonatal outcomes after induction of labor without an identified indication

AU - Dublin, Sascha

AU - Lydon-Rochelle, Mona

AU - Kaplan, Robert C.

AU - Watts, D. Heather

AU - Critchlow, Cathy W.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to examine associations between induction of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women without an identified indication for induction. STUDY DESIGN: This was a population-based cohort study of 2886 women with induced labor and 9648 women with spontaneous labor who were delivered at 37 to 41 weeks' gestation, all without identified medical and obstetric indications for induction. RESULTS: Among nulliparous women 19% of women with induced labor versus 10% of those with spontaneous labor underwent cesarean delivery (adjusted relative risk, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-2.08). No association was seen in multiparous women (relative risk, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.39). Among all women induction was associated with modest increases in instrumental delivery (19% vs 15%; relative risk, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.32) and shoulder dystocia (3.0% vs 1.7%; relative risk, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.69). CONCLUSION: Among women who lacked an identified indication for induction of labor, induction was associated with increased likelihood of cesarean delivery for nulliparous but not multiparous women and with modest increases in the risk of instrumental delivery and shoulder dystocia for all women.

AB - OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to examine associations between induction of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women without an identified indication for induction. STUDY DESIGN: This was a population-based cohort study of 2886 women with induced labor and 9648 women with spontaneous labor who were delivered at 37 to 41 weeks' gestation, all without identified medical and obstetric indications for induction. RESULTS: Among nulliparous women 19% of women with induced labor versus 10% of those with spontaneous labor underwent cesarean delivery (adjusted relative risk, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-2.08). No association was seen in multiparous women (relative risk, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.39). Among all women induction was associated with modest increases in instrumental delivery (19% vs 15%; relative risk, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.32) and shoulder dystocia (3.0% vs 1.7%; relative risk, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.69). CONCLUSION: Among women who lacked an identified indication for induction of labor, induction was associated with increased likelihood of cesarean delivery for nulliparous but not multiparous women and with modest increases in the risk of instrumental delivery and shoulder dystocia for all women.

KW - Cesarean delivery

KW - Induction of labor

KW - Instrumental delivery

KW - Shoulder dystocia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033791753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033791753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1067/mob.2000.106748

DO - 10.1067/mob.2000.106748

M3 - Article

VL - 183

SP - 986

EP - 994

JO - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0002-9378

IS - 4

ER -