Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women

Rachel S. Gross, Alan L. Mendelsohn, Michelle B. Gross, Roberta Scheinmann, Mary Jo Messito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the relations between household material hardships and having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity in low-income Hispanic pregnant women. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a third trimester prenatal visit from women participating in the Starting Early Study, a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a primary care-based family-centered early child obesity prevention intervention. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we determined whether 4 domains of material hardship (food insecurity, difficulty paying bills, housing disrepair, neighborhood stress), considered individually and also cumulatively, were associated with having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Results: The sample included 559 low-income Hispanic pregnant women, with 60% having experienced at least 1 hardship. Food insecurity was independently associated with a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-3.77), controlling for other hardships and confounders. Experiencing a greater number of material hardships was associated in a dose-dependent relationship with an increased odds of having a low internal locus of control. Conclusions: Prenatal material hardships, in particular food insecurity, were associated with having a lower prenatal internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort is needed to determine how relations between material hardships and having a low internal locus of control will ultimately affect infant feeding practices and child weight trajectories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 30 2015

Fingerprint

Internal-External Control
Pediatric Obesity
Hispanic Americans
Pregnant Women
Food Supply
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Infant
  • Locus of control
  • Poverty
  • Pregnancy
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women. / Gross, Rachel S.; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Gross, Michelle B.; Scheinmann, Roberta; Messito, Mary Jo.

In: Academic Pediatrics, 30.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gross, Rachel S. ; Mendelsohn, Alan L. ; Gross, Michelle B. ; Scheinmann, Roberta ; Messito, Mary Jo. / Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women. In: Academic Pediatrics. 2015.
@article{e1a60966920d41c4bf41f702d2fe29f8,
title = "Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the relations between household material hardships and having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity in low-income Hispanic pregnant women. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a third trimester prenatal visit from women participating in the Starting Early Study, a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a primary care-based family-centered early child obesity prevention intervention. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we determined whether 4 domains of material hardship (food insecurity, difficulty paying bills, housing disrepair, neighborhood stress), considered individually and also cumulatively, were associated with having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Results: The sample included 559 low-income Hispanic pregnant women, with 60{\%} having experienced at least 1 hardship. Food insecurity was independently associated with a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.38; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.50-3.77), controlling for other hardships and confounders. Experiencing a greater number of material hardships was associated in a dose-dependent relationship with an increased odds of having a low internal locus of control. Conclusions: Prenatal material hardships, in particular food insecurity, were associated with having a lower prenatal internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort is needed to determine how relations between material hardships and having a low internal locus of control will ultimately affect infant feeding practices and child weight trajectories.",
keywords = "Infant, Locus of control, Poverty, Pregnancy, Weight",
author = "Gross, {Rachel S.} and Mendelsohn, {Alan L.} and Gross, {Michelle B.} and Roberta Scheinmann and Messito, {Mary Jo}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1016/j.acap.2016.02.003",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Academic Pediatrics",
issn = "1876-2859",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Material Hardship and Internal Locus of Control Over the Prevention of Child Obesity in Low-Income Hispanic Pregnant Women

AU - Gross, Rachel S.

AU - Mendelsohn, Alan L.

AU - Gross, Michelle B.

AU - Scheinmann, Roberta

AU - Messito, Mary Jo

PY - 2015/9/30

Y1 - 2015/9/30

N2 - Objective: To determine the relations between household material hardships and having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity in low-income Hispanic pregnant women. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a third trimester prenatal visit from women participating in the Starting Early Study, a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a primary care-based family-centered early child obesity prevention intervention. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we determined whether 4 domains of material hardship (food insecurity, difficulty paying bills, housing disrepair, neighborhood stress), considered individually and also cumulatively, were associated with having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Results: The sample included 559 low-income Hispanic pregnant women, with 60% having experienced at least 1 hardship. Food insecurity was independently associated with a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-3.77), controlling for other hardships and confounders. Experiencing a greater number of material hardships was associated in a dose-dependent relationship with an increased odds of having a low internal locus of control. Conclusions: Prenatal material hardships, in particular food insecurity, were associated with having a lower prenatal internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort is needed to determine how relations between material hardships and having a low internal locus of control will ultimately affect infant feeding practices and child weight trajectories.

AB - Objective: To determine the relations between household material hardships and having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity in low-income Hispanic pregnant women. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected during a third trimester prenatal visit from women participating in the Starting Early Study, a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a primary care-based family-centered early child obesity prevention intervention. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, we determined whether 4 domains of material hardship (food insecurity, difficulty paying bills, housing disrepair, neighborhood stress), considered individually and also cumulatively, were associated with having a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Results: The sample included 559 low-income Hispanic pregnant women, with 60% having experienced at least 1 hardship. Food insecurity was independently associated with a low internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-3.77), controlling for other hardships and confounders. Experiencing a greater number of material hardships was associated in a dose-dependent relationship with an increased odds of having a low internal locus of control. Conclusions: Prenatal material hardships, in particular food insecurity, were associated with having a lower prenatal internal locus of control over the prevention of child obesity. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort is needed to determine how relations between material hardships and having a low internal locus of control will ultimately affect infant feeding practices and child weight trajectories.

KW - Infant

KW - Locus of control

KW - Poverty

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Weight

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84962197464&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84962197464&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.acap.2016.02.003

DO - 10.1016/j.acap.2016.02.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 26861931

AN - SCOPUS:84962197464

JO - Academic Pediatrics

JF - Academic Pediatrics

SN - 1876-2859

ER -