Magnetic resonance imaging of obstetrical brachial plexus injuries

Ira Richmond Abbott, III, Matthew Abbott, Juan Alzate, Daniel Lefton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We reviewed MR imaging in infants with Erb's palsy. The goal was to determine the effectiveness of MR imaging in predicting operative findings for these infants. Methods: Fifteen patients (mean age: 14.5 months) underwent surgical exploration of the brachial plexus. Preoperative MR imaging was acquired in all patients with a GE (Milwaukee, WI, USA) 1.5-Tesla MRI and correlated with the surgical findings as outlined in the children's operative notes. Results: Through imaging, the presence of at least one pseudomeningocele was found in 8 of the 15 patients (53.3%) while 3 of the 15 patients (20%) had multiple pseudomeningoceles. Posterior shoulder subluxation was seen in 11 patients (73.3%). Fourteen children (93.3%) had imaging abnormalities consistent with either a reparative neuroma or scar tissue investing plexus elements. We were unable to differentiate between the two with MR imaging. At surgery, scar tissue was found entrapping the C5-C6 roots, upper trunk, and/or lateral and posterior cords in 11 patients (73.3%) while 4 patients had reparative neuromas. Two patients had both entrapment by scar tissue and a reparative neuroma. Either entrapment by scar tissue or neuroma was found in all 15 patients (100%). Conclusions: MR imaging is an effective tool for demonstrating lesions of the brachial plexus worthy of surgical exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-725
Number of pages6
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Arm Injuries
Brachial Plexus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neuroma
Cicatrix
Brachial Plexus Neuropathies

Keywords

  • Erb's palsy
  • Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Magnetic resonance imaging of obstetrical brachial plexus injuries. / Abbott, III, Ira Richmond; Abbott, Matthew; Alzate, Juan; Lefton, Daniel.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 20, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 720-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abbott, III, Ira Richmond ; Abbott, Matthew ; Alzate, Juan ; Lefton, Daniel. / Magnetic resonance imaging of obstetrical brachial plexus injuries. In: Child's Nervous System. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 10. pp. 720-725.
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