MacEwen, William

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

William MacEwen (1848-1924) pioneered a number of innovative techniques in brain surgery at the turn of the twentieth century. An early advocate of Joseph Lister's principles of antisepsis, he rapidly adopted these techniques to his surgical practice leading to a marked reduction in patient morbidity and infection. MacEwen successfully used the cerebral localization principles to determine where to operate, leading him to publish a landmark work in 1893 on pyogenic infections of the brain. That book was based on antiseptic principles, cerebral localization, and neurological diagnosis, a work that had an enormous influence on the practice of brain surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages952-953
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9780123851574
ISBN (Print)9780123851581
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Antisepsis
  • Brain surgery
  • Broca, Pierre Paul
  • Charcot, Jean-Martin
  • Cushing, Harvey
  • Dandy, Walter
  • Ferrier, David
  • Horsley, Victor
  • Intracerebral abscess
  • Intubation
  • Krause, Fedor V.
  • Lister, Joseph
  • MacEwen, William
  • MacLeod, George
  • Neurosurgery
  • Oppenheim, Hermann

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Goodrich, J. T. (2014). MacEwen, William. In Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences (pp. 952-953). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-385157-4.00950-7