Low-dose naloxone does not improve morphine-induced nausea, vomiting, or pruritus

Peter W. Greenwald, Jennifer Provataris, John Coffey, Polly E. Bijur, E. John Gallagher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that low-dose naloxone delivered with intravenous (IV) bolus morphine to emergency department patients in pain would reduce nausea. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients receiving 0.10 mg/kg morphine IV bolus rated pain, nausea, and pruritus on 100-mm visual analog scales at enrollment and 20 minutes. Patients were randomized to 0.25 μg/kg naloxone or equal volume placebo administered with IV morphine. One hundred thirty-one enrolled, 99 (76%) treated according to protocol with sufficient data for analysis. At 20 minutes the difference between groups (naloxone-placebo) was 1 mm (95% CI [confidence interval], -9 to 11) for nausea, 1 mm (95% CI, -3 to 3) for pruritus, 4% (95% CI, -1 to 9) for vomiting, and 0% (95% CI, -5 to 5) for rescue antiemetics. Pain was significantly reduced in both groups. Addition of 0.25 μg/kg naloxone to bolus morphine does not improve nausea, pruritus, vomiting, or reduce use of rescue antiemetics when administered to emergency department patients in pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

Fingerprint

Pruritus
Naloxone
Morphine
Nausea
Vomiting
Confidence Intervals
Pain
Antiemetics
Placebos
Hospital Emergency Service
Visual Analog Scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Low-dose naloxone does not improve morphine-induced nausea, vomiting, or pruritus. / Greenwald, Peter W.; Provataris, Jennifer; Coffey, John; Bijur, Polly E.; Gallagher, E. John.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 35-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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