Liver function tests in sickle cell disease

S. Richard, Henny H. Billett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the prevalence of positive viral hepatitis titres in sickle cell disease (SCD) and the relationship of abnormal liver function tests (LFTs) to transfusions and ferritin levels. Charts from 141 patients with SCD were reviewed and recent laboratory data on serum ferritin, hepatitis serology, units of packed red blood cells transfused and LFTs were collected. Hepatitis B core antibodies were positive in 14% of patients (12/86) and Hepatitis C viral antibody titres were positive in 16.5% (15/91). There was a relationship of positive serologies to transfusion for hepatitis C virus (HCV), but not for hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis C antibody negative (HCVAb-) patients had fewer packed red blood cells (pRBC) transfused than Hepatitis C antibody positive (HCVAb+) (6.4 vs. 20.3, P = 0.08). Patients with ferritins < 500 ng/ml compared to those with > 1000 ng/ml also showed a difference in units transfused (P < 0.003). Steady state LFTs, with the exception of alkaline phosphatase, had no relationship to serum ferritin or hepatitis serologies. Males were twice as likely to have positive serology as females but more females had elevated ferritin levels. Paired analysis of LFTs in steady state and crisis failed to demonstrate deterioration during crisis. We conclude that: (1) there is a relationship of positive Hepatitis C serology, but not Hepatitis B serology, to transfusion; (2) ferritin levels correlate with transfusion number but not with LFTs; (3) in our population, LFTs in SCD are usually normal and do not increase in vaso-occlusive crises.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-27
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Laboratory Haematology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Liver Function Tests
Sickle Cell Anemia
Serology
Ferritins
Liver
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Hepatitis
Viruses
Blood
Erythrocytes
Cells
Viral Antibodies
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
Serum
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Alkaline Phosphatase
Deterioration

Keywords

  • Iron-overloaded
  • Liver function
  • Sickle cell
  • Transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Liver function tests in sickle cell disease. / Richard, S.; Billett, Henny H.

In: Clinical and Laboratory Haematology, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2002, p. 21-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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