Lipoprotein levels and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women

Kathryn Anastos, François Ndamage, Dalian Lu, Mardge H. Cohen, Qiuhu Shi, Jason Lazar, Venerand Bigirimana, Eugene Mutimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Lipoprotein profiles in HIV-infected African women have not been well described. We assessed associations of lipoprotein levels and cardiovascular risk with HIV-infection and CD4 count in Rwandan women.Methods: Cross-sectional study of 824 (218 HIV-negative, 606 HIV+) Rwandan women. Body composition by body impedance analysis, CD4 count, and fasting serum total cholesterol (total-C), triglycerides (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were measured. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was calculated from Friedewald equation if TG < 400 and measured directly if TG ≥ 400 mg/dl.Results: BMI was similar in HIV+ and -negative women, < 1% were diabetic, and HIV+ women were younger. In multivariate models LDL was not associated with HIV-serostatus. HDL was lower in HIV+ women (44 vs. 54 mg/dL, p < 0.0001) with no significant difference by CD4 count (p = 0.13). HIV serostatus (p = 0.005) and among HIV+ women lower CD4 count (p = 0.04) were associated with higher TG. BMI was independently associated with higher LDL (p = 0.01), and higher total body fat was strongly associated with higher total-C and LDL. Framingham risk scores were < 2% in both groups.Conclusions: In this cohort of non-obese African women HDL and TG, but not LDL, were adversely associated with HIV infection. As HDL is a strong predictor of cardiovascular (CV) events in women, this HIV-associated difference may confer increased risk for CV disease in HIV-infected women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number34
JournalAIDS Research and Therapy
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Virology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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    Anastos, K., Ndamage, F., Lu, D., Cohen, M. H., Shi, Q., Lazar, J., Bigirimana, V., & Mutimura, E. (2010). Lipoprotein levels and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women. AIDS Research and Therapy, 7, [34]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1742-6405-7-34