Linking sleep to hypertension: Greater risk for blacks

A. Pandey, N. Williams, M. Donat, Mirnova E. Ceide, P. Brimah, G. Ogedegbe, S. I. McFarlane, G. Jean-Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Evidence suggests that insufficient sleep duration is associated with an increased likelihood for hypertension. Both short (<6 hours) and long (>8 hour) sleep durations as well as hypertension are more prevalent among blacks than among whites. This study examined associations between sleep duration and hypertension, considering differential effects of race and ethnicity among black and white Americans. Methods. Data came from a cross-sectional household interview with 25,352 Americans (age range: 18-85 years). Results. Both white and black short sleepers had a greater likelihood of reporting hypertension than those who reported sleeping 6 to 8 hours. Unadjusted logistic regression analysis exploring the race/ethnicity interactions between insufficient sleep and hypertension indicated that black short (<6 hours) and long (>8 hours) sleepers were more likely to report hypertension than their white counterparts (OR = 1.34 and 1.37, resp.; P < 0.01). Significant interactions of insufficient sleep with race/ethnicity were observed even after adjusting to effects of age, sex, income, education, body mass index, alcohol use, smoking, emotional distress, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke. Conclusion. Results suggest that the race/ethnicity interaction is a significant mediator in the relationship between insufficient sleep and likelihood of having a diagnosis of hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number436502
JournalInternational Journal of Hypertension
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep
Hypertension
Sex Education
Coronary Disease
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Smoking
Stroke
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Interviews
hydroquinone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Pandey, A., Williams, N., Donat, M., Ceide, M. E., Brimah, P., Ogedegbe, G., ... Jean-Louis, G. (2013). Linking sleep to hypertension: Greater risk for blacks. International Journal of Hypertension, 2013, [436502]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/436502

Linking sleep to hypertension : Greater risk for blacks. / Pandey, A.; Williams, N.; Donat, M.; Ceide, Mirnova E.; Brimah, P.; Ogedegbe, G.; McFarlane, S. I.; Jean-Louis, G.

In: International Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 2013, 436502, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pandey, A, Williams, N, Donat, M, Ceide, ME, Brimah, P, Ogedegbe, G, McFarlane, SI & Jean-Louis, G 2013, 'Linking sleep to hypertension: Greater risk for blacks', International Journal of Hypertension, vol. 2013, 436502. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/436502
Pandey, A. ; Williams, N. ; Donat, M. ; Ceide, Mirnova E. ; Brimah, P. ; Ogedegbe, G. ; McFarlane, S. I. ; Jean-Louis, G. / Linking sleep to hypertension : Greater risk for blacks. In: International Journal of Hypertension. 2013 ; Vol. 2013.
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