Lighting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) evolution with an ancient LAMP: the existence of a functional CMA activity in fish

Amaury Herpin, Laury Lescat, Julien Bobe, Andreas Jenny, Iban Seiliez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), as one of the main pathways of lysosomal catabolism, plays essential roles for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. To date, the absence of any identifiable LAMP2A–the necessary and limiting protein required for CMA–in non-tetrapod lineages, led to the paradigm that this cellular process was restricted to mammals and birds. The recent findings of Lescat et al., demonstrating the existence of a CMA activity in fish, now reshuffle the cards regarding how the entire evolution of CMA function should be considered and appreciated across metazoans. Hence, beyond challenging the current tetrapod-centered accepted view, the work of Lescat et al. tackles the possibility–or the compelling need–of using complementary and powerful genetic models, such as zebrafish or medaka, for studying this fundamental function from an evolutionary perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1918-1920
Number of pages3
JournalAutophagy
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2020

Keywords

  • CMA
  • Chaperone-mediated autophagy
  • Lamp2a
  • evolution
  • fish
  • medaka
  • zebrafish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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