Lifestyle and dietary factors in relation to risk of chronic myeloid leukemia in the NIH-AARP diet and health study

Geoffrey C. Kabat, Jennifer W. Wu, Steven C. Moore, Lindsay M. Morton, Yikyung Park, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Thomas E. Rohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Aside from exposure to ionizing radiation and benzene, little is known about lifestyle risk factors for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the general population. Methods:Weexamined the relation between lifestyle and dietary risk factors forCMLin 493,188 participants (294,271 males and 198,917 females) aged 50 to 71 years who completed a baseline questionnaire in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study in 1995 to 1996. Over a median of 10.5 years of follow-up, 178 incident cases of CML (139 males and 39 females) were ascertained from state registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for exposures of interest, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: In multivariable analysis of all participants combined, female sex, years of education, and vigorous physical activity (HR for >3 times/week vs. <1 time/week 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99) were inversely associated with risk of CML, whereas smoking intensity (HR for smokers of-20 cigarettes per day vs. never smokers: 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27) and body mass (HR for BMI>30 vs. <25 kg/m2 1.46; 95% CI, 0.95-2.23) were associated with increased risk. A range of dietary factors was not associated with disease. Conclusions: This study adds to the sparse information about lifestyle factors, which affect the risk of CML in the general population. Impact: If these findings are confirmed, it would suggest thatCMLmaybe amenable to preventive strategies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 22(5); 848-54.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)848-854
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

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Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Life Style
Diet
Health
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Sex Education
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Tumor Biomarkers
Ionizing Radiation
Benzene
Proportional Hazards Models
Population
Registries
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lifestyle and dietary factors in relation to risk of chronic myeloid leukemia in the NIH-AARP diet and health study. / Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Wu, Jennifer W.; Moore, Steven C.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Rohan, Thomas E.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 22, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 848-854.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabat, Geoffrey C. ; Wu, Jennifer W. ; Moore, Steven C. ; Morton, Lindsay M. ; Park, Yikyung ; Hollenbeck, Albert R. ; Rohan, Thomas E. / Lifestyle and dietary factors in relation to risk of chronic myeloid leukemia in the NIH-AARP diet and health study. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 848-854.
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abstract = "Background: Aside from exposure to ionizing radiation and benzene, little is known about lifestyle risk factors for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the general population. Methods:Weexamined the relation between lifestyle and dietary risk factors forCMLin 493,188 participants (294,271 males and 198,917 females) aged 50 to 71 years who completed a baseline questionnaire in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study in 1995 to 1996. Over a median of 10.5 years of follow-up, 178 incident cases of CML (139 males and 39 females) were ascertained from state registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals for exposures of interest, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: In multivariable analysis of all participants combined, female sex, years of education, and vigorous physical activity (HR for >3 times/week vs. <1 time/week 0.70; 95{\%} CI, 0.49-0.99) were inversely associated with risk of CML, whereas smoking intensity (HR for smokers of-20 cigarettes per day vs. never smokers: 1.53; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-2.27) and body mass (HR for BMI>30 vs. <25 kg/m2 1.46; 95{\%} CI, 0.95-2.23) were associated with increased risk. A range of dietary factors was not associated with disease. Conclusions: This study adds to the sparse information about lifestyle factors, which affect the risk of CML in the general population. Impact: If these findings are confirmed, it would suggest thatCMLmaybe amenable to preventive strategies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 22(5); 848-54.",
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T1 - Lifestyle and dietary factors in relation to risk of chronic myeloid leukemia in the NIH-AARP diet and health study

AU - Kabat, Geoffrey C.

AU - Wu, Jennifer W.

AU - Moore, Steven C.

AU - Morton, Lindsay M.

AU - Park, Yikyung

AU - Hollenbeck, Albert R.

AU - Rohan, Thomas E.

PY - 2013/5

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N2 - Background: Aside from exposure to ionizing radiation and benzene, little is known about lifestyle risk factors for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the general population. Methods:Weexamined the relation between lifestyle and dietary risk factors forCMLin 493,188 participants (294,271 males and 198,917 females) aged 50 to 71 years who completed a baseline questionnaire in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study in 1995 to 1996. Over a median of 10.5 years of follow-up, 178 incident cases of CML (139 males and 39 females) were ascertained from state registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for exposures of interest, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: In multivariable analysis of all participants combined, female sex, years of education, and vigorous physical activity (HR for >3 times/week vs. <1 time/week 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99) were inversely associated with risk of CML, whereas smoking intensity (HR for smokers of-20 cigarettes per day vs. never smokers: 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27) and body mass (HR for BMI>30 vs. <25 kg/m2 1.46; 95% CI, 0.95-2.23) were associated with increased risk. A range of dietary factors was not associated with disease. Conclusions: This study adds to the sparse information about lifestyle factors, which affect the risk of CML in the general population. Impact: If these findings are confirmed, it would suggest thatCMLmaybe amenable to preventive strategies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 22(5); 848-54.

AB - Background: Aside from exposure to ionizing radiation and benzene, little is known about lifestyle risk factors for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the general population. Methods:Weexamined the relation between lifestyle and dietary risk factors forCMLin 493,188 participants (294,271 males and 198,917 females) aged 50 to 71 years who completed a baseline questionnaire in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study in 1995 to 1996. Over a median of 10.5 years of follow-up, 178 incident cases of CML (139 males and 39 females) were ascertained from state registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for exposures of interest, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results: In multivariable analysis of all participants combined, female sex, years of education, and vigorous physical activity (HR for >3 times/week vs. <1 time/week 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99) were inversely associated with risk of CML, whereas smoking intensity (HR for smokers of-20 cigarettes per day vs. never smokers: 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.27) and body mass (HR for BMI>30 vs. <25 kg/m2 1.46; 95% CI, 0.95-2.23) were associated with increased risk. A range of dietary factors was not associated with disease. Conclusions: This study adds to the sparse information about lifestyle factors, which affect the risk of CML in the general population. Impact: If these findings are confirmed, it would suggest thatCMLmaybe amenable to preventive strategies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 22(5); 848-54.

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