Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research

Sudha R. Raman, Lesley H. Curtis, Robert Temple, Tomas Andersson, Justin Ezekowitz, Ian Ford, Stefan James, Keith Marsolo, Parsa Mirhaji, Mitra Rocca, Russell L. Rothman, Barathi Sethuraman, Norman Stockbridge, Sharon Terry, Scott M. Wasserman, Eric D. Peterson, Adrian F. Hernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electronic health records (EHRs) can be a major tool in the quest to decrease costs and timelines of clinical trial research, generate better evidence for clinical decision making, and advance health care. Over the past decade, EHRs have increasingly offered opportunities to speed up, streamline, and enhance clinical research. EHRs offer a wide range of possible uses in clinical trials, including assisting with prestudy feasibility assessment, patient recruitment, and data capture in care delivery. To fully appreciate these opportunities, health care stakeholders must come together to face critical challenges in leveraging EHR data, including data quality/completeness, information security, stakeholder engagement, and increasing the scale of research infrastructure and related governance. Leaders from academia, government, industry, and professional societies representing patient, provider, researcher, industry, and regulator perspectives convened the Leveraging EHR for Clinical Research Now! Think Tank in Washington, DC (February 18-19, 2016), to identify barriers to using EHRs in clinical research and to generate potential solutions. Think tank members identified a broad range of issues surrounding the use of EHRs in research and proposed a variety of solutions. Recognizing the challenges, the participants identified the urgent need to look more deeply at previous efforts to use these data, share lessons learned, and develop a multidisciplinary agenda for best practices for using EHRs in clinical research. We report the proceedings from this think tank meeting in the following paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume202
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Electronic Health Records
Research
Industry
Clinical Trials
Delivery of Health Care
Practice Guidelines
Patient Selection
Research Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Raman, S. R., Curtis, L. H., Temple, R., Andersson, T., Ezekowitz, J., Ford, I., ... Hernandez, A. F. (2018). Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research. American Heart Journal, 202, 13-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2018.04.015

Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research. / Raman, Sudha R.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Temple, Robert; Andersson, Tomas; Ezekowitz, Justin; Ford, Ian; James, Stefan; Marsolo, Keith; Mirhaji, Parsa; Rocca, Mitra; Rothman, Russell L.; Sethuraman, Barathi; Stockbridge, Norman; Terry, Sharon; Wasserman, Scott M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 202, 01.08.2018, p. 13-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raman, SR, Curtis, LH, Temple, R, Andersson, T, Ezekowitz, J, Ford, I, James, S, Marsolo, K, Mirhaji, P, Rocca, M, Rothman, RL, Sethuraman, B, Stockbridge, N, Terry, S, Wasserman, SM, Peterson, ED & Hernandez, AF 2018, 'Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research', American Heart Journal, vol. 202, pp. 13-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2018.04.015
Raman SR, Curtis LH, Temple R, Andersson T, Ezekowitz J, Ford I et al. Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research. American Heart Journal. 2018 Aug 1;202:13-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2018.04.015
Raman, Sudha R. ; Curtis, Lesley H. ; Temple, Robert ; Andersson, Tomas ; Ezekowitz, Justin ; Ford, Ian ; James, Stefan ; Marsolo, Keith ; Mirhaji, Parsa ; Rocca, Mitra ; Rothman, Russell L. ; Sethuraman, Barathi ; Stockbridge, Norman ; Terry, Sharon ; Wasserman, Scott M. ; Peterson, Eric D. ; Hernandez, Adrian F. / Leveraging electronic health records for clinical research. In: American Heart Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 202. pp. 13-19.
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