Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency

John P. Bent, Marvin P. Fried, Richard V. Smith, Wayne Hsueh, Karen Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program’s attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P =.461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1078-1079
Number of pages2
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)
Volume156
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Otolaryngology
Internship and Residency
Aptitude
Self Concept

Keywords

  • leadership
  • otolaryngology
  • residency
  • training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency. / Bent, John P.; Fried, Marvin P.; Smith, Richard V.; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), Vol. 156, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1078-1079.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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