Laparoscopic approach in patients with recurrent Crohn's disease

Renee Huang, Brian T. Valerian, Edward C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to review our experience with laparoscopic management of Crohn's disease including patients with prior Crohn's-related abdominal surgery. All cases of Crohn's patients who underwent laparoscopic attempt for management of disease from April 2005 to October 2010 (n = 130) at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Evaluated datapoints include: prior abdominal surgery for Crohn's disease, operative time, rate of conversion, and complication rate. Of the 130 patients, 82 (63.1%) patients had no prior abdominal surgery and 48 (36.9%) patients had previous bowel surgery with mean age of 35.3 (3.5-79) and 41.3 (15-66) years, respectively. Operative time with no prior surgery was 106 (23-245) minutes, and with prior surgery was 100 (26-229) minutes. Estimated blood loss with no prior surgery was 116 (5-800) mL, and with prior surgery was 123 (5-800) mL. Conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery in those with no prior surgery was 17.1 per cent and in those with prior surgery, 20.8 per cent (P = 0.64). Postoperative complications were found in 13 patients (15.9%) without prior abdominal surgery and 13 patients (27.1%) with prior surgery (P = 0.17). The most common postoperative complication in both groups was infection/abscess (8.5%). The laparoscopic management of recurrent Crohn's disease is a safe and technically feasible option, even in those patients with prior history of Crohn's-related abdominal surgery, with a low complication rate and low conversion rate. The utility of the laparoscopic approach in Crohn's patients faced with repeat abdominal procedures may be beneficial in the long-term and should be considered as a method to limit morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-599
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume78
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Crohn Disease
Operative Time
Conversion to Open Surgery
Disease Management
Abscess
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Huang, R., Valerian, B. T., & Lee, E. C. (2012). Laparoscopic approach in patients with recurrent Crohn's disease. American Surgeon, 78(5), 595-599.

Laparoscopic approach in patients with recurrent Crohn's disease. / Huang, Renee; Valerian, Brian T.; Lee, Edward C.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 78, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 595-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, R, Valerian, BT & Lee, EC 2012, 'Laparoscopic approach in patients with recurrent Crohn's disease', American Surgeon, vol. 78, no. 5, pp. 595-599.
Huang, Renee ; Valerian, Brian T. ; Lee, Edward C. / Laparoscopic approach in patients with recurrent Crohn's disease. In: American Surgeon. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 5. pp. 595-599.
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