Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues

Lawrence S. Bass, Mehmet C. Oz, Joseph S. Auteri, Matthew R. Williams, Jeffrey Rosen, Stephen K. Libutti, Alexander M. Eaton, John Lontz, Roman Nowygrod, Michael R. Treat

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid growth of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and other laproscopic procedures has created the need for simple, secure techniques for laparoscopic closure without sutures. While laser tissue welding offers one solution to this problem, concerns about adequacy of weld strength and watertightness remain. Tissue solders are proteinaceous materials which are placed on coapted tissue edges of the tissue to be closed or sealed. Laser energy is then applied to fix the glue in place completing the closure. Closure of the choledochotomy following a laparoscopic common duct exploration is one potential application of this technique. Canine longitudinal choledochotomies 5 mm in length were sealed using several laser glues and using the 808 nm diode laser. Saline was then infused until rupture of the closure and peak bursting strength recorded. Fibrinogen glue provided moderately good adhesion but poor burst strength. Handling characteristics were variable. A viscosity adjusted fibrinogen preparation produced good adherence with mean weld strength 264 ± 7 mm Hg. The clinical endpoint for welding was a whitening and drying of the tissue. New laser tissue solders can provide a watertight choledochotomy closure of adequate immediate strength. This would allow reliable, technically feasible common bile duct exploration via a laparoscopic approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsGrahm M Watson, Rudolf W. Steiner, Joseph J. Pietrafitta
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages164-168
Number of pages5
Volume1421
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of Lasers in Urology, Laparoscopy, and General Surgery - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 21 1991Jan 23 1991

Other

OtherProceedings of Lasers in Urology, Laparoscopy, and General Surgery
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period1/21/911/23/91

Fingerprint

glues
Glues
closures
Tissue
Lasers
weld strength
lasers
fibrinogen
solders
welding
ducts
Soldering alloys
Ducts
Welding
Welds
adequacy
fixing
drying
Semiconductor lasers
bursts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Bass, L. S., Oz, M. C., Auteri, J. S., Williams, M. R., Rosen, J., Libutti, S. K., ... Treat, M. R. (1991). Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues. In G. M. Watson, R. W. Steiner, & J. J. Pietrafitta (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 1421, pp. 164-168). Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering.

Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues. / Bass, Lawrence S.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Auteri, Joseph S.; Williams, Matthew R.; Rosen, Jeffrey; Libutti, Stephen K.; Eaton, Alexander M.; Lontz, John; Nowygrod, Roman; Treat, Michael R.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / Grahm M Watson; Rudolf W. Steiner; Joseph J. Pietrafitta. Vol. 1421 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1991. p. 164-168.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bass, LS, Oz, MC, Auteri, JS, Williams, MR, Rosen, J, Libutti, SK, Eaton, AM, Lontz, J, Nowygrod, R & Treat, MR 1991, Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues. in GM Watson, RW Steiner & JJ Pietrafitta (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 1421, Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, pp. 164-168, Proceedings of Lasers in Urology, Laparoscopy, and General Surgery, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 1/21/91.
Bass LS, Oz MC, Auteri JS, Williams MR, Rosen J, Libutti SK et al. Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues. In Watson GM, Steiner RW, Pietrafitta JJ, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1421. Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering. 1991. p. 164-168
Bass, Lawrence S. ; Oz, Mehmet C. ; Auteri, Joseph S. ; Williams, Matthew R. ; Rosen, Jeffrey ; Libutti, Stephen K. ; Eaton, Alexander M. ; Lontz, John ; Nowygrod, Roman ; Treat, Michael R. / Laparoscopic applications of laser-activated tissue glues. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / Grahm M Watson ; Rudolf W. Steiner ; Joseph J. Pietrafitta. Vol. 1421 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1991. pp. 164-168
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