Ketoconazole inhibits Malassezia furfur morphogenesis in vitro under filamentation optimized conditions

Sirida Youngchim, Joshua D. Nosanchuk, Siriporn Chongkae, Nongnuch Vanittanokom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malassezia furfur, a constituent of the normal human skin flora, is an etiological agent of pityriasis versicolor, which represents one of the most common human skin diseases. Under certain conditions, both exogenous and endogenous, the fungus can transition from a yeast form to a pathogenic mycelial form. To develop a standardized medium for reproducible production of the mycelial form of M. furfur to develop and optimize susceptibility testing for this pathogen, we examined and characterized variables, including kojic acid and glycine concentration, agar percentage, and pH, to generate a chemically defined minimal medium on which specific inoculums of M. furfur generated the most robust filamentation. Next, we examined the capacity of ketoconazole to inhibit the formation of M. furfur mycelial form. Both low and high, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 µg/ml concentrations of ketoconazole significantly inhibited filamentation at 11.9, 54.5 and 86.7%, respectively. Although ketoconazole can have a direct antifungal effect on both M. furfur yeast and mycelial cells, ketoconazole also has a dramatic impact on suppressing morphogenesis. Since mycelia typified the pathogenic form of Malassezia infection, the capacity of ketoconazole to block morphogenesis may represent an additional important effect of the antifungal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Dermatological Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 24 2016

Fingerprint

Malassezia
Ketoconazole
Morphogenesis
Yeasts
Tinea Versicolor
Mycelium
Skin Diseases
Glycine
Agar
In Vitro Techniques
Fungi
Skin
Infection

Keywords

  • Filament
  • Ketoconazole
  • Malassezia furfur
  • Morphogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Ketoconazole inhibits Malassezia furfur morphogenesis in vitro under filamentation optimized conditions. / Youngchim, Sirida; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Chongkae, Siriporn; Vanittanokom, Nongnuch.

In: Archives of Dermatological Research, 24.11.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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