Keeping the spirit of community partnerships alive in the scale up of HIV/AIDS prevention: Critical reflections on the roll out of DEBI (Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions)

Shari L. Dworkin, Rogério M. Pinto, Joyce Hunter, Bruce D. Rapkin, Robert H. Remien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DEBI, or the Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions is the largest centralized effort to diffuse evidence-based prevention science to fight HIV/AIDS in the United States. DEBI seeks to ensure that the most effective science-based prevention interventions are widely implemented across the country in community-based organizations. Thus, this is a particularly timely juncture in which to critically reflect on the extent to which known principles of community collaboration have guided key processes associated with the DEBI rollout. We review the available evidence on how the dissemination of packaged interventions is necessary but not sufficient for ensuring the success of technology transfer. We consider additional principles that are vital for successful technology transfer, which were not central considerations in the rollout of the DEBI initiative. These issues are: (1) community perceptions of a top-down mode of dissemination; (2) the extent to which local innovations are being embraced, bolstered, or eliminated; and (3) contextual and methodological considerations that shape community preparedness. Consideration of these additional factors is necessary in order to effectively document, manage, and advance the science of dissemination and technology transfer in centralized prevention efforts within and outside of HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-59
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume42
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
Technology Transfer
HIV
technology transfer
community
science
evidence
innovation

Keywords

  • Community partnerships
  • Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI)
  • HIV/AIDS prevention interventions
  • Power relations
  • Technology transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Keeping the spirit of community partnerships alive in the scale up of HIV/AIDS prevention : Critical reflections on the roll out of DEBI (Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions). / Dworkin, Shari L.; Pinto, Rogério M.; Hunter, Joyce; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Remien, Robert H.

In: American Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 42, No. 1-2, 09.2008, p. 51-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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