Job histories in open employment of a population of young adults with mental retardation: I

S. A. Richardson, H. Koller, Mindy Joy Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Job histories were obtained for a population of young adults with mental retardation. No one with IQ less than 50 had been in open employment. Persons with mild mental retardation (n = 100) who received no adult services were compared to peers who were not retarded (n = 52) who left school without academic qualifications on a variety of job measures (e.g., unemployment, time out of the labor force, job turnover, level of job skill, and take-home pay). Among the 54 subjects with IQs of 50 or more who received adult services, approximately half had some open employment. Our results provide a less optimistic picture than that given by reviewers of previous research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-491
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume92
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1988

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job history
Intellectual Disability
young adult
Young Adult
Population
Unemployment
turnover
labor force
qualification
unemployment
human being
Research
school
History
Mental Retardation
Young Adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Job histories in open employment of a population of young adults with mental retardation : I. / Richardson, S. A.; Koller, H.; Katz, Mindy Joy.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 92, No. 6, 1988, p. 483-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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