Jaundice and breast-feeding among Alaskan Eskimo newborns

Q. Fisher, Michael I. Cohen, L. Curda, H. McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The course, incidence, and severity of neonatal jaundice was studied in 95 Alaskan Eskimo infants. Breast-fed infants had higher bilirubin concentrations than bottle-fed babies. Both groups experienced high bilirubin levels, similar to those previously reported in Navajo and Oriental infants but greater than those observed in whites and blacks. A marked capacity to inhibit hepatic glucuronyl transferase was observed in breast-milk specimens but only partly accounted for the bilirubin differences between breast-fed and bottle-fed Eskimo infants. These data suggest that in some racial groups predisposed to neonatal jaundice, feeding practices significantly alter the course and severity of hyperbilirubinemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)859-861
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume132
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1978

Fingerprint

Inuits
Jaundice
Breast Feeding
Bilirubin
Newborn Infant
Neonatal Jaundice
Breast
Hyperbilirubinemia
Human Milk
Transferases
Liver
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Jaundice and breast-feeding among Alaskan Eskimo newborns. / Fisher, Q.; Cohen, Michael I.; Curda, L.; McNamara, H.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 132, No. 9, 1978, p. 859-861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fisher, Q, Cohen, MI, Curda, L & McNamara, H 1978, 'Jaundice and breast-feeding among Alaskan Eskimo newborns', American Journal of Diseases of Children, vol. 132, no. 9, pp. 859-861.
Fisher, Q. ; Cohen, Michael I. ; Curda, L. ; McNamara, H. / Jaundice and breast-feeding among Alaskan Eskimo newborns. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1978 ; Vol. 132, No. 9. pp. 859-861.
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