Intrauterine devices at six months: Does patient age matter? Results from an urban family medicine federally qualified health center (FQHC) network

Anita Ravi, Linda Prine, Eve Waltermaurer, Natasha Miller, Susan E. Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) can address high rates of unintended pregnancy among adolescents in the United States by increasing access to intrauterine devices (IUDs) in underserved settings. Despite national guidelines endorsing adolescent use of IUDs, some physicians remain concerned about IUD tolerance and safety in adolescents. Therefore we compared adolescents and adults in a family physician staffed FQHC network with regard to (1) IUD postinsertion experience, (2) device discontinuation, and (3) sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among women < 36 years old who had an IUD inserted in 2011 at a New York City FQHC staffed by family physicians.

Results: We included 684 women (27% adolescents, 73% adults). During the 6-month postinsertion period, 59% of adolescents and 43% of adults initiated IUD-related clinical contact after insertion, most commonly for bleeding changes and pelvic or abdominal pain. There were no significant differences between groups in IUD expulsion or removal or STI rates.

Conclusions: Urban FQHC providers may anticipate that, compared with their adult IUD users, adolescents will initiate more clinical follow-up visits after insertion. Both groups will, however, have similar clinical concerns about, reasons for, and rate of device discontinuation and low STI rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)822-830
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Contraception
  • Intrauterine devices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

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